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1 Lera Colyer

in the Cook County, Illinois Marriage Index, 1930-1960
Name: Lera Colyer
Marriage Date: 28 Dec 1950
Spouse: Frank T. Sokolik
Marriage Location: Cook County, IL
Marriage license: {A63CCD78-731B-4D0D-BA74-FB2DF5660983}
File Number: 2165525
Archive Collection Name: Cook County Genealogy Records (Marriages)
Archive repository location: Chicago, IL
Archive repository name: Cook County Clerk 
Family: F07751
 
2 Pulaski Co., KY Marriage Bk IV, pg 53 Family: F7929
 
3 Virginia Marriage Records; p. 278
 
Family: F505
 
4 15 APR 1877 in Pulaski Co., KY Marriage Bk III, pg. 60
Description: in the home of John Bray. 
Family: F7917
 
5 1880 Wise Co Collier Census



Name Relation Marital Sex Race Age Born Occ. Parents

Status Born

Milton H. COLLIER Self M Male W 35 KY Farmer KY KY

Isabella COLLIER Wife M Female W 32 KY Keeping KY KY

House

Mary J. COLLIER Dau S Female W 14 KY At Home KY KY

William H COLLIER Son S Male W 12 KY Works KY KY

On Farm

Benjamin S. COLLIER Son S Male W 10 KY Works KY KY

On Farm

Milton P. COLLIER Son S Male W 8 MO At Home KY KY

Sarah E. COLLIER Dau S Female W 6 KS At Home KY KY

James P. COLLIER Son S Male W 3 TX At Home KY KY

Peter P. COLLIER Son S Male W 1 TX At Home KY KY

Mary J. COLLIER Mother L W Female W 60 KY Asst In (VA) (VA) Keeping House



 
Family: F483
 
6 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family: F7995
 
7 Bowman, Fred Q. 10,000 Vital Records of Central New York 1813-1850. Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1986 Family: F059
 
8 Forrest (as he was known) was a farmer and had 100 plus acres in Pumpkin Hollow, Ky. outside Somerset or Elihu, Ky. He raised most everything they needed, he had milk cows, hogs, chickens, a huge garden, grape arbor, apple trees, several horses. He never owned an automobile, but rode his buckboard wagon to Somerset for supplies several times a year, particularly after his crops or hogs or beef sold to have what his family needed for the winter. He even raised a small patch of tobacco. He dried it and would bring it in in a special apron and shred it by hand to smoke in his pipe. They had no electricity in the house, only a battery powered radio that he turned on several hours each evening for the news.
He also chewed tobacco and when I was small I would have to watch out for the "spitting" when he was on the front porch on his swing and chewing. He didn't look when he spit so you had to be careful. I remember he was a tall man, very gentle and had a smile and laugh that would make you enjoy just being around him. He was kind to the grandchildren who stayed in the summer for Ohio and educated them in the ways of the farm every chance he got.
He farmed behind a horsedrawn plow right up until the hour of his death. He came in to rest and have lunch and as usual Pearl went to get him a dipper of water while he sat in the front yard in a chair in the shade. When she came back with the dipper of cold water, he was gone. 
Family: F008
 
9 He came to America from England. According to his own recording in the family bible, he was a professor for 30 or 40 years. This was recorded when he was 79 years old. We do not know who he married or when he died. A recording in the bible said he left Virginia December 11, 1792. We believe he must have settled somwhere around Williamsburg or Rockhold KY.  Family: F687
 
10 http://genealogytrails.com/ken/lincoln/marriages.html
Lincoln County, KY Marriages

Source: Kentucky Birth, Marriage and Death Records ? 1852-1910.
Microfilm rolls #994027-994058

Submitted by K. Torp

Fred P Curtis abt 1852 July E Reynolds abt 1861 19 Dec 1878 
Family: F044
 
11 http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=77308104

Birth: Dec. 25, 1924
Watson
Atchison County
Missouri, USA
Death: Jul. 16, 2009
Fort Worth
Tarrant County
Texas, USA

FORT WORTH -- Alice Louise Hays Collyer Young died on Thursday, July 16, 2009.

Memorial service: 10 a.m. Wednesday at Edge Park United Methodist Church. Interment: Laurel Land Memorial Park.

Alice was born on Dec. 25, 1924, in Watson, Mo., to Arlo and Mary Weston Hays. She was a graduate of Methodist Hospital in St. Joseph, Mo.

Alice worked as an RN for the Fort Worth Public Health Center for 18 years, retiring in 1975. She was a member of Edge Park United Methodist Church and Order of the Eastern Star-Mineral Wells Chapter 44.

She was preceded in death by her first husband and father of her children, Carl O. Collyer.

Survivors: Husband of nine years, Jerry R. Young; children, Pat Hatchel and her husband, Bill, David Collyer, John Collyer and his wife, Debra, Mary Faherty, Vivian Culp and her husband, Doyle; eight grandchildren; one great-grandchild; sister, Ellen Simpson; nephews; nieces; and her stepchildren, Ronnie Young and his wife, Sheila, Richard Young and his wife, Kelly, Michael Young and John Young.

Fort Worth Star-Telegram (TX)
Date: July 19, 2009

Family links:
Spouse:
Carl Otis Collyer (1923 - 1992)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Laurel Land Memorial Park
Fort Worth
Tarrant County
Texas, USA
Plot: Garden of Last Supper 26
 
Family: F8022
 
12 Jack and Edith eloped by driving to Huntsville TN and arriving at night, drove to the house of the local Judge, and honked the horn in his driveway until he came out and married them. Jack and Edith drove down from Somerset with another couple one evening. Married by L.M. Jeffers (Rec.Book 18, pg 73) Family: F001
 
13 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family: F686
 
14 married by the Rev John B Hoyt Family: F059
 
15 Married: 24 APR 1883 in Pulaski Co., KY Marriage Bk III, pg. 6 Family: F211
 
16 Pulaski Co., KY Marriage Bk III, pg. 60 Family: F7925
 
17 Pulaski Co., KY Marriage Bk IV, pg. 52 Family: F7926
 
18 Pulaski Co., KY Marriage Bk IV, pg. 52 Family: F7930
 
19 Washington DC paper report of their weddings states they made their home in North Brookfield Mass. Family: F662
 
20 [Archfam[2].FTW]

1880 Pulaski County Census, District 87, town of Somerset, shows:

L. R. Collier, Head of household, age 35, born KY, both parents born KY
Catherine, Wife, age 21, born KY, both parents born KY
James, Son, age 12, born Ky, both parents born KY
Andrew, Son, age 10, born KY, both parents born KY
Cordelia, Daughter, age 6, born KY, both parents born KY
John, Son, age 5, born KY, both parents born KY
Charlie, Son, age 2, born KY, both parents born KY
M. T. Collier, Uncle, age 50, born KY, both parents born TN

 
Family: F267
 
21 [Archfam[2].FTW]

6 March, 1913 Colyer, Oscar W. 19 1st marriage, res Pulaski County, born Pulaski County, Father & mother born Pulaski County, occupation- farmer. Waddle, Zada M. 21 1st marriage residence Pulaski County, Parents born Pulaski County, Place of marriage F. F. Stigall's with S. B. Lander presiding. Witnesses J. L. Waddle & J. E. Waddle. Surety-J. H. Colyer, Clerk-C. M. Langdon. 
Family: F07783
 
22 [Archfam[2].FTW]

Groom 24 1st b. Pulaski Co, father b. PUL, mother b. PUL
Bride 18 1st B. Pulaski Co, father b. PUL, mother b. PUL
Robert James
Surety: Robert James
Witnesses: C.M. Simpson, John James
Presiding: F.M. Hill 
Family: F07673
 
23 [Archfam[2].FTW]

Pulaski County Kentucky, Marriage Record Book IV shows:
20 July, 1898, Parsons, Ernest, 21, 1st marriage, born Pulaski County, Father born Montgomery County, Mother born Pulaski County, Banker; Trimble, Ida B., 19, 1st marriage, born Pulaski County, Father born Pulaski County, Mother born Pulaski County, at H. G. Trimble house, Surety Sam Boone, Witnesses, L. D. S. Patton and James Harvey, Presiding E. B. Hill, minister Methodist Episcopal Church. 
 
24 [Archfam[2].FTW]

THE COMMONWEALTH, SOMERSET, KY., OCTOBER 24, 1919

Corrine Hudson, Society Editor.

Mr. Vola Padgett and Miss Lyda Colyer surprised their many friends when they slipped quietly away to Oneida, Tennessee, on last Sunday night, and were married. They were accompanied by Mr. William Tanner and Miss Edna Young, when it was made known that Mr. Tanner and Miss Young have been secretly married since July 5. The two couples have been closely associated for some time. They returned to Somerset on (Southern Railway) No. 6 Tuesday, and will make their home in this city. The Commonwealth extends congratulations. 
Family: F07750
 
25 [Archfam[2].FTW]

Wedding Announcement, Somerset Commonwealth?, October, 1927

Miss Ola Colyer and Mr. Henry Parsons, popular members of Somerset's younger set, were quietly married Saturday morning at 8 o'clock at the parsonage of the First Methodist Church, Reverend W. P. Fryman officiating. The only attendants were Mrs. Fryman and Miss Ruby Berkley. Following the ceremony, they were driven to Danville by Misses Christine Waddle and Helen Higgins where they took the train for Chicago. Upon their return today they will go to housekeeping in an apartment on Central Avenue which has been attractively furnished.
The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Colyer, Jr., and is one of Somerset's most attractive and popular girls. She graduated from the Somerset High School and later took a business course. For the past two years she has been employed by the W. H. Tibbals Drug Company.
Mr. Parsons is the son of Dr. and Mrs. Ernest Parsons, and is employed by the Consolidated Coach Company. He is held in high esteem by the officials of the company and is considered one of its most valuable employees. By his courteous treatment and pleasing manner he has made many friends among the patrons of the company. He is one of Somerset's splendid young men and has a host of friends who are extending congratulations and best wishes. 
Family: F07721
 
26 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Weldon Lee Barker
 
27
The Colyer Family of Pulaski County TN shows this as John Perry Colyer vs. James Perry.
 
James Perry Colyer (J.P.)
 
28 James P Colyer is listed in Confederate military records as having signed up the same day as his brother Charles J. Granade Colyer in 1863. Both their brother, John Wesley Colyer Jr. was 2nd in command of the 6th Ky Calvary as 1st Lt.

Members of 6th Kentucky Confederate Calvary
6th Kentucky Confederate Calvary from http://www.rootsweb.com/~kymil/cw/conf/sixth_kentucky_cavalry.html

M.B. Perkins C Captain Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
J. Wesley Collier C 1st Lieutenant Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Later moved after war to Perry Georgia
Virgil P. Moore C 2nd Lieutenant Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Supposed to be prisoner
John S. May C 2nd Lieutenant Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Supposed to be prisoner
Alfred L. Alcorn C 2nd Lieutenant Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Killed while being transferred from Johnson's Island to Fort Delaware; prisoner of war.
S. J. Brown C 2nd Lieutenant Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Wounded in Lebanon, Ky. July 5, 1863
Alfred L. Alcorn C 1st Sgt. Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Promoted to 2nd. Lt.
Stephen J. Brown C 2nd Sgt. Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Promoted to 2nd. Lt.
Joseph Lane C 3rd Sgt. Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Samuel Gover C 4th Sqt. Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Lafayette Moore C 1st Corp. Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Missing Oct. 17, 1862
Milford Lee C 2nd Corp. Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Robert Phelps C 3rd Corp. Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Daniel Colyer C 4th Corp. Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Hardin Alexander C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
John Brown C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Missing Oct. 16, 1862
Jonas Brown C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Benjamin Brown C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Missing Oct. 15, 1862
James Birch C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
William H. Ballew C Private Oct. 2, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Missing Oct. 15, 1862
William Ballew C Private Oct. 2, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Iradell Bray C Private Oct. 2, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Milford Bralton C Private Oct. 2, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
William Burton C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Missing Oct. 14, 1862 d. 1928 bur. Pleasant Point, Lincoln Co., KY
Willis Colyer C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Charles W. Colyer C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
James G. Colyer C Private Sept. 17, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Richard Colyer C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
George Callahan C Private Sept. 15, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
William C. Curd C Private Sept. 15, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
William Colyer C Private Oct. 8, 1862 Somerset, Ky. buried Colyer cemetery highway 769 (Rush Branch Rd)
Logan Colyer C Private Nov. 1, 1862 Knoxville, Tn.

James P. Colyer C Private Jan. 24, 1863 Beech Grove, Tn.

C.J. Colyer C Private Jan. 24, 1863 Beech Grove, Tn. (This is Granade Colyer)

Lewis P. Cowan C Private Oct. 14, 1862 Lancaster, Tn. By transfer from Capt. Shanks' Co. in Jan, 1863
Martin T. Colyer C Private Dec. 1, 1862 Mufreesboro, Tn. By transfer from Capt. Shanks' Co. in Jan, 1863
Samuel B. Colyer C Private Jan. 4, 1862 Monticello, Ky. By transfer from Capt. B.E. Roberts' Co. in Jan, 1863
Thomas Dans C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Elijah Denny C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Doctor Denny C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Elijah Dikes C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Deserted Dec. 20, 1862
S. Wesley Earp C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
W. Madison Earp C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
John Eastham C Private Sept. 15, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
James Eastham C Private Oct. 23, 1862 New Market, Tn.
Perry Elliott C Private Sept. 6, 1862 Danville, Ky. By transfer from Capt. Lemmon's Co., Jan. 7, 1863
E.T. Elliott C Private Feb. 1, 1863 Beech Grove, Tn.
Walter J. Fields C Private Transferred to Capt. Shanks' Co., Sept. 1, 1862
Chrisley Gastinew, Sr. C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Chrisley Gastinew, Jr. C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Martin Gregg C Private Oct. 8, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
James Gilmore C Private Oct. 8, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Washington Herrin C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Edward Herrin C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Levi Hubble C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. last name spelled Hubbel on Ags report, by transfer from Capt. Shanks' Co., Nov., 17 1862
Joseph A. Hardwick C Private Transferred to Capt. B.E. Roberts' Co., January 1863
Thomas Hargis C Private Died Feb. 10, 1863
Thomas Jasper C Private Sept. 13, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Martin Keeney C Private Nov. 6, 1862 New Market, Tn.
James Luytrell, Sr. C Private Sept. 13, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
James Luytrell, Jr. C Private Sept. 13, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Wesley Long C Private Deserted Dec. 20, 1862
Archibald Marshall C Private Oct. 8, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
James Moonyham C Private Somerset, Ky.
Jacob Miller C Private Somerset, Ky.
Moses Murphy C Private Beech Grove, Tn.
William Murphy C Private Lancaster, Ky. By transfer from Capt. Shanks' Co. in Jan, 1863
Simeon E. Owens C Private Somerset, Ky. Died Feb. 3, 1863
George Pence C Private Somerset, Ky.
T.K. Phelps C Private Somerset, Ky.
Henry Powell C Private Beech Grove, Tn.
Jesse L. Reynolds C Private Somerset, Ky.
Moses Reynolds C Private Somerset, Ky.
Robert W. Reynolds C Private Somerset, Ky. Buried in Liberty Baptist Church Cem., Pulaski Co., Ky. Was last surviving Confederate soldier in Lincoln Co., Ky.
Alexander Randall C Private
Josiah Smith C Private Somerset, Ky.
James C. Smith C Private Somerset, Ky.
Willis J. Stogsdell C Private Sept., 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Quarles Simpson C Private Oct. 11, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Missing Oct.14, 1862
John J. Smiley C Private Oct.8, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Cornelius Simpson C Private Nov. 16, 1862 Sweet Water, Tn.
William Thompson, Sr. C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Missing Oct.14, 1862
William Thompson, Jr. C Private Sept. 13, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Missing Oct.16, 1862
James R. Turner C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Joseph C. Vanhook C Private Sept. 13, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Andrew Vanhook C Private Died Feb. 13, 1863
George Wheeldon C Private Sept. 13, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Missing Oct. 21, 1862
Robert Warren C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Missing Oct. 14, 1862
William Woodcock C Private Sept. 15, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
G.A. Warren C Private Sept. 15, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Missing Oct. 16, 1862
John W. Williams C Private Oct. 2, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Missing Oct. 16, 1862
David Warren C Private Sept. 15, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
W.W. Cleaver D Captain June  
James Perry Colyer (J.P.)
 
29 One of the original purchasers of the town of Hadden, CT Nicholas Achley
 
30 He appeared in the census in 1860 in New York. He died before 1870. Charles L. Ackley
 
31 He was living between 1850 and 1870 in McDonough, Chenango , New York. living with parents 1850 On 14 September 1850 he was a Pedlar in McDonough, Chenango , New York. On 26 June 1860 Charles was a Justice of the Peace in McDonough, Chenango , New York. On 24 August 1870 he was a BookKeeper in McDonough, Chenango , New York. On 22 June 1880 he was an a laborer in Waterloo, Black Hawk , Iowa. Charles was living between 1880 and 1900 in Waterloo, Black Hawk , Iowa. He died on 28 April 1905. He appeared in the census 1850, 1860 & 1870 in New York. Charles appeared in the census 1880, 1895 & 1900 in IA.

Town of East McDonough,
WAR OF THE REBELLION--The part taken by this town in aid of the war is one to which its
inhabitants may point with just pride. The town furnished six men in excess of its various quotas. All the special meetings called to consider the question of paying bounties and to devise means for filling the quotas were held in the room of Varanes C. Emerson's store, which is hallowed by many of the gravest associations of that historic period.

At a special meeting held Sept. 20, 1862, it was resolved to pay a bounty of $50 to each volunteer applied on the quota of the town under the call for 600,000 men after July 2, 1862. Eleazer Isbell, Eli L. Corbin, Joseph L. Beebe, Jacob P. Hill and Asa M. Daniels were appointed a committee to raise the money and pay said bounties. Sept. 26, 1862, the committee borrowed $2,000 of the Bank of Norwich and gave their note therefor, payable in eighteen months. They paid to each of 27 individuals $50, and to each of 13 individuals, $48, making a total of $1,974.

At a special meeting held Jan. 16, 1864, a bounty of $323 was voted to each volunteer applied on the quota of the town under the recent call, and Varanes C. Emerson, Stephen Lewis 2d, and Charles T. Ackley were empowered to raise the money, pay the bounties and issue the bonds of the town for the amount necessary, payable Feb. 1, 1875. 
Charles T. Ackley
 
32 She appeared in the census between 1880 and 1895 in IA. She was living in 1895. Emma appeared in the census in 1910 in New York. She was living in 1910 in Pharsalia, Chenango, New York. living with Aunt Ellen Brown 1910 She appeared in the census in 1930 in California. Emma was living in 1930 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles , California. living with sister Julia 1930 Emma Mae Ackley
 
33 He appeared in the census in 1870 in New York. Emmit A. Ackley
 
34 He appeared in the census in 1870 in New York. On 22 June 1880 he was an a laborer in Eureka, Sac , Iowa. George appeared in the census in 1880 in IA. He was living in 1880 in Eureka, Sac , Iowa. living with uncle Asahel Brainerd Holmes George N. Ackley
 
35 appeared in the census in 1880 in IA. Harry Ackley
 
36 On 22 June 1880 she was an a school teacher in Waterloo, Black Hawk , Iowa. She was living between 1880 and 1895 in Waterloo, Black Hawk , Iowa. living with parents 1880
living with father 1895 Julia was living in 1910 in Pharsalia, Chenango, New York. living with Aunt Ellen Brown 1910 She appeared in the census in 1930 in California. She was living in 1930 in Los Angeles, California. Julia appeared in the census 1860, 1870 & 1910 in New York. She appeared in the census 1880, 1895, 1900 & 1910 in IA. also listed as living and teaching school in Burlington, Black Hawk, Iowa in 1880 
Julia A. Ackley
 
37 Julia's uncle, William D. Purple, was a medical doctor who practiced medicine in McDonough NY 1830-1840 per McDonough section of book History of Chenango and Madison County NY Julia Ann Ackley
 
38 Per 1830-1860 NY census: He was living in 1830 in Saithville, Chenango , New York. He was living between 1840 and 1860 in McDonough, Chenango , New York. On 14 September 1850 Lyman was a Farmer in McDonough, Chenango , New York. On 25 June 1860 he was a Retired Farmer in McDonough, Chenango , New York. Lyman Ackley
 
39 On 24 June 1880 she was an a milliner in McDonough, Chenango , New York. She was living in 1880 in McDonough, Chenango , New York. living with Levi Sanford 1880 Mary appeared in the census between 1895 and 1910 in IA. She was living in 1895 in Waterloo, Black Hawk , Iowa. living with father 1895 She appeared in the census 1860, 1870 & 1880 in New York. Mary J. Ackley
 
40 appeared in the census in 1880 in IA. Susan Ackley
 
41 He appeared in the census in 1850 in New York. He was living in 1850 in McDonough, Chenango , New York. living with parents On 14 September 1850 William was a Lawyer in McDonough, Chenango , New York. He was living between 1860 and 1870 in Waterloo, Black Hawk , Iowa. On 20 June 1870 he was a Real Estate Dealer in Waterloo, Black Hawk , Iowa. On 1 June 1880 William was an a lead miner in Dubuque, Iowa. He was living in 1880 in Dubuque, Iowa. He died about 1900. William appeared in the census 1860, 1870 & 1880 in IA. The town of Ackley, Hardin, Iowa is named after him. Roby was the first postmaster in this part of the country. He lodged the passengers on the stage that made the first trip to Waterloo. He was the owner of the present site of the city of Ackley, and conveyed to the Dubuque and
Sioux City Railroad Company one half of the town site, or every alternate lot. The company conveyed their interest to William J. Ackley of Waterloo, hence the town derived its name. He was, at one time, owner of 2,500 acres of land in the county. He also gave the railroad the right of way through his entire tract of land, and worked earnestly for the establishment of the rail line. He was also liberal in donating to the Iowa Central Railroad Company.

What's strange is that Ackley never resided in Ackley. From what we were told, Ackley also founded the town of Aplington about 15 miles east of Ackley. Ackley had purchased land in the area for the expantion of railroads. 
William J. Ackley
 
42 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. June Avera
 
43 From Ballous in America by Hawley 1937: Merideth Ballou spent his adult life in two several sections of Ashe Co., N. C. He was a man of distinction -- wealthy in lands, mines, negroes and all the concomitants of an old fashioned Southern planter -- an influential magistrate of his County -- and an eminent member of the Regular Baptist denomination. Mrs. Mary, the wife of his youth, a pious Baptist, and the mother of the above named chn., d. June 12, 1831, a. 51 yrs. 1 mo. and 9 ds. At the age of 70, Merideth3 m. his 2d wife, but had no further issue. He d. Mar. 17, 1847, a. 80 yrs. 5 mos. and 18 ds. He left a large estate to his chn. He owned, at one time, 10,000 acres of land, rich in mineral ores. (Owen) Merideth Ballou
 
44 source: http://www.danielprophecy.com/Meredith_Ballou.html
Owen Meredith Ballou
"Pioneer Iron Man"
1766 - 1847

One of the more distinguished ancestors of Grover and Harrison Shepherd was their great grandfather Owen Meredith Ballou. Meredith was an entrepeneur who amassed large land holdings and mineral rights, established the forging of iron in Ashe County, and contributed significantly to the industrialization and development of the County during its earliest formative years.

Meredith was born September 29, 1766 in the James River Valley of Amherst County, Virginia as the third son of Leonard Ballou and Ms. Boliew (first name unknown).

He was the first of the Virginia Ballous to come to Ashe County. At the time Meredith arrived, Ashe County had not yet been formed. Ashe County was established in 1799. Prior to that, it was part of Wilkes County. Most sources list Meredith Ballou as coming to Ashe County in 1800. This is based on the first Ashe County census of 1800. Eleanor Baker Reeves, a Ballou researcher, author and historian, feels there is ?ample evidence that Meredith came some time between 1790 and 1795, the latter date having been the year of his marriage.? [1]

Meredith?s name appears regularly in works concerning early Ashe County history. He served various terms as county surveyor and many times as a member of the County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions.

The following biography of Meredith Ballou appears in An Elaborate History and Genealogy of the Ballous in America by Adin Ballou:

?Merideth Ballou spent his adult life in two several sections of Ashe Co., N.C. He was a man of distinction-wealthy in lands, mines, negroes and all the concomitants of an old fashioned Southern planter-an influential magistrate of his County-and an eminent member of the Regular Baptist denomination. Mrs. Mary, the wife of his youth, a pious Baptist, and the mother of the above named chn., d. June 12, 1831, a. 51 yrs. 1 mo. And 9ds. At the age of 70, Merideth m. his 2d wife, but had no further issue. He d. Mar. 17, 1847, a. 80 yrs. 5 mos. And 18ds. He left a large estate to his chn. He owned, at one time, 10,000 acres of land, rich in mineral ores.? (sic) [2]

Arthur Fletcher in his Ashe County: A History, provides a list of men who were developing all parts of Ashe County in the early days. He pays tribute particularly to Henry Poe, Martin Gambill, Thomas Sutherland, Timothy Perkins, John Cox, Henry Hardin, Canada Richardson, James Douglas, Daniel Dickerson, Elijah Calloway, Meredith Ballou, and Thomas Harbard. [3]

Married Mary (Polly )Baker

Meredith Ballou married Mary (Polly) Baker, a local resident of Wilkes County (later Ashe). She was the daughter of Morris Baker, one of the leading men responsible for the formation of the County of Ashe, and the granddaughter of James Baker, the first man to hold title to land in this area.

In regards to early setters of Ashe County, Fletcher said,

?The question, ?Who came first?? to Ashe County will probably never be answered to the satisfaction of anybody. Bill Sharpe in his Geography of Ashe notes that Bishop Spangenberg and his explorers were there in 1752, but he also states that history records that Peter Jefferson and his surveying party, engaged in establishing the line between North Carolina and Virginia, were on Pond Mountain in 1749. Sharpe says that so far as his research goes, the first white man to acquire title to land in Ashe County was James Baker, in 1773.? [4]

This makes James Baker a great, great, great grandfather of Grover and Harrison Shepherd. A quick view of this line follows. The direct descendent of the previous generation is in bold:

James Baker
Morris Baker
Mary (Polly) Baker married Meredith Ballou
John Rice Ballou married Sarah Porter
Sarah Ballou married John Calvin Shepherd
Sons: Grover and Harrison Shepherd


Acquired Much Land

Meredith Ballou came from a mining family and embarked on Ashe County in search of iron ore. He found outcroppings of iron ore in the areas of the North Fork New River and Big Helton Creek. Meredith built a spacious home on the banks of the North Fork about 1/4 mile north of the current Crumpler Post Office and set about building his fortune. Through state land grants and purchases from individuals, Meredith eventually acquired about 10,000 acres of land in Ashe County. Fletcher includes Meredith Ballou in a list of about 30 men who could be considered ?big real estate men? in Ashe County between 1799 and 1820. [5]

Mining and Iron Forging

Aside from his other accomplishments, Meredith?s legacy is in iron. His acquistion of mineral rights, mining, and subsequent forging of iron earned him the designation of ?pioneer iron man.?

For about 80 years, the manufacture of iron was an important industry in Ashe, and was one of the cornerstones of the Industrial Revolution. As the county developed, there was great need for iron products such as plows, hoes, wagon wheels, axes, mattocks, scythe-blades, shovels, and other tools and equipment.

With Helton Creek as its iron-making center, Ashe County?s six or seven forges turned out sufficient iron for local needs and provided a surplus to ship by wagon to Fayetteville and other points in eastern North Carolina, and to Charleston, South Carolina.

To encourage ironmaking in North Carolina, a legislative act of 1788 offered to everyone who erected a set of ironworks and produced 5,000 pounds of iron, a bounty grant of 3,000 acres of vacant land certified by the county court as unfit for cultivation.

One person to receive such a grant was Daniel Dougherty, who later sold 2,725 of his 3,000-acre grant to Meredith in 1814. Others to receive these grants were Thomas Calloway, a close business associate of Meredith Ballou, and Jesse Ray. Fletcher says,

?That there were similar grants to Meredith Ballou, William Harbard, and others is certain, but the only grant appearing in the County Court records was to Jesse Ray?? [6]

Ballou?s Iron Forges

The first iron forge to operate in Ashe County was the Harbard Bloomery Forge, built about mile up from the mouth of Big Helton Creek in 1807 by William Harbard. The Harbard Bloomery Forge was sold to Meredith Ballou in 1813. It washed away in 1817.

Meredith Ballou set up his second forge in 1817. It was called ?Ballou?s Bloomery Forge?, and was situated 12 miles northeast of Jefferson at the falls of North Fork of the New River. It was washed away by an ice feshet in 1832.

After Meredith?s death in 1847, his son John Rice Ballou (grandfather of brothers Grover and Harrison Shepherd) set up a forge near the mouth of Big Helton Creek in 1848. This forge was reported to have been rebuilt in 1871 by Jefferson Pasley, and later abandoned. The reason this forge had to be rebuilt is not known. It could have also suffered from flood waters, or it could have possibly been destroyed by Union Raiders during the Civil War. The site of this forge would later be the site of Ballou?s Grist Mill.

Ore Knob Copper Mine

Among the many land purchases of Meredith Ballou was about 300 acres that later came to be known as Ore Knob. Meredith was in search of iron, but found that this site ?was so badly adulterated with copper that it was useless.?

Meredith and his sons neglected this tract of land and never paid the taxes due. Eventually, the sheriff sold the tract for taxes in 1848. It brought enough to pay the taxes and cost of sale, leaving a balance of $11, which was divided among Meredith's heirs. Later, the Ore Knob Copper Mine was opened and became successful.

Interesting Notes

In James Larkin Ballou Physician and Surgeon, Reeves records some interesting diary entries about Meredith Ballou by Rev. Elisha Mitchell, D.D. bearing the date of July 1828. Dr. Mitchell, for whom Mount Mitchell, the highest point East of the Mississippi is named, spent some time with Meredith Ballou and recorded the following:

?Mounted my horse and rode to the North of Helton ten miles and fording the stream thirty-two times in the distance and then down North Fork to Col. Meredith Ballou?s.?

?Col. Meredith Ballou, at whose house I put up on Thursday, is of French extraction, a native of Amherst County, Virginia. He owns a forge, is a busy active little man still, though sixty-one years of age and the father of eleven sons and two daughters, but a wife thirteen years younger than himself and looks as if she might bear a number of children more. Between the ages of his oldest and youngest daughters there is a difference of thirty years.?

?He tells me that the first forge in this county was built on Helton Creek a little above where he lives, about twenty years ago by one Harbert. Shortly after another was built a little higher up the same creek, fourteen years ago; that on Little River, four or six years ago.?

?----- After dinner Ballou rode with us two or three miles to see his ore banks, which are numerous and rich. Indeed, I judge the range of greios heretofore spoken of to be full of ore.? [7]

NOTES

1. Eleanor Baker Reeves, James Larkin Ballou Physician and Surgeon, 1969, page 81. Return
2. Adin Ballou, An Elaborate History and Genealogy of the Ballous in America, (Proprietary Publishers, 1888), page 1225. Return
3. Arthur L. Fletcher, Ashe County: A History, (Jefferson NC., Ashe County Research Association, Inc. 1963), page 116. Return
4. Arthur L. Fletcher, Ashe County: A History, (Jefferson NC., Ashe County Research Association, Inc. 1963), page 39. Return
5. Arthur L. Fletcher, Ashe County: A History, (Jefferson NC., Ashe County Research Association, Inc. 1963), page 48. Return
6. Arthur L. Fletcher, Ashe County: A History, (Jefferson NC., Ashe County Research Association, Inc. 1963), page 86. Return
7. Eleanor Baker Reeves, James Larkin Ballou Physician and Surgeon, 1969, pages 87, 88 Return
8. Lists comprising the children of Merdith and Mary Ballou list the aforementioned 11 children. Other sources report 13 children, but names of the other two children are not given. Return
9. Eleanor Baker Reeves, James Larkin Ballou Physician and Surgeon, 1969, page 84. Return  
(Owen) Merideth Ballou
 
45 Note that it appears that Levi Ballou and his brother Allen Ballou married sisters, Mary Polly Ann Lewis and Martha Nancy Lewis Allen Ballou
 
46 A twin of Nannie Emerine Ballou
 
47 Sam Colyer diary records Leon's aunt Hattie coming to visit and stay with them in Somerset May 7, 1949 and Leon and Aunt Hattie go to Greenwood Ky for visit May 8, 1949. Harriet (Hattie) Ballou
 
48 Harriette Simpson Arnow, in her 1986 book titled Old Burnside, pub. The University Press of Kentucky, in the first chapter of books writes: in 1849 "During this same year a great event happened in Point Isabel: the first settler came. James Ballou, fifty-one years old and of French Descent, paid Daniel Smith and his wife, Elizabeth, $1,000 for a large boundary of land that began on Cumberland River and extended over most of what would become lower Burnside, excluding a strip of land along the South Fork.

James Ballou no doubt knew the Cumberland sometimes flooded wide areas of land. He built his home on higher but level land quite a distance from the rivers, where the tides never came. The two-story house with wide porches for both stories was of weatherboard and frame construction and was in good condition in the Burnside I knew as a child. The lumber for the Ballou home had been cut by a fairly new invention--a rotary saw powered by steam. Such a saw could within a few minutes cut more lumber than the earlier whip or pit saw, powered by two men, a horse or a stream of water. The rotary saw had been in use since 1830 and was not long in reaching Pulaski County. Most of the first log homes of early settlers were by 1849 being weatherboarded or replace by frame or brick.

There were fifteen children in the Ballou home, and Shortly after moving to Point Isabel, they began to marry and settle in homes of their own. On of the older Ballou boys, Levi bought a small tract of land from his father; less than a year later he put up a dwelling and married Polly Ann Lewis. He sold out in 1857 to W.T. Heath and moved away. Another Ballou boy, Allen, married Nancy Lewis, daughter of John Shelby Lewis, and settled nearby in Antioch. Allen is one of the best remembered of James Ballou's children, partly because he lived until 1928, dying at ninety, bu mainly because of the sermons many older people had heard him preach in the Antioch Church of Christ and elsewhere. "

A few pages later Mrs. Arnow writes of civil war times:
"Most of the inhabitants of Point Isabel were probably pleased by thoughts of protection when Union General Ambrose E. Burnside, in command of a good-sized body of troops, came in March 1863 to make the place his headquarters. The general, a West Point graduate, had had so far an up-and-down career. Promoted to the rank of major-general, he was sent late in 1862 to the Army of the Potomac, commanded by General George B. McClellan. President Lincoln, angered by McClellan's failure to capture General Robert E. Lee and his army, replaced McClellan, with Burnside. Shortly after taking command, Burnside with 113,000 troops was defeated by Lee with 75,000 men at the Battle of Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862.

Burnside was at once replace by General Joseph Hooker and relegated to the command of the Department of the Ohio. It was in this capacity that he came to Point Isabel, his purpose to stop Confederate troops that might enter Kentucky by the Cumberland River or the Somerset-Tennessee border road.

On reaching Point Isabel, on of Burnside's first acts was to commandeer the home of James Ballou for his headquarters. Some of the local old-timers thought Burnside did not sleep there, but spent his nights in one of the lookout homes in the highland around Clio. Wherever the general slept, during the day he was at the house, planning work for his troops. 
James Larkin Ballou
 
49 Joseph Ballou, 1239 Ormsby Court, Louisville, KY 1953: cited in Lafayette TN Smith County TN newspaper column by Cal Smith Oct 1, 1953--- said that James Ballou settled near the Falls of Cumberland River, at a place called Sawyer. Later he located at Point Isabella, now Burnside in 1850. He reared his family there and in the latter par of his life, removed to Indiana where he died.

The book Ballous in America by Hawley says that James was a minister of the Regular Baptists, but attended largely to farming interests. He lived first in Ashe County NC then a while in VA, then in Pulaski County KY. But in 1861 removed to Boone Co. Indiana where he died of pneumonia in 1863 at about 64 years. His wido died in 1869 at 63 years

quote from James W. Arnett: "...James died 1863, Boone Co., Indiana. Dr. James L. Ballou was a physician and surgeon and benefactor of the Univ. of North Carolina. He corresponded with Eleanor Baker Reeves of UNC in compiling his genealogy as listed above. He and Frankey moved back to Point Isabel, Pulaski Co., KY in 1832..."
 
James Larkin Ballou
 
50 Transcribed By Pamela Vick

October 29, 1953

* CAL?S COLUMN *

MORE BALLOU INFORMATION

We are in receipt of the following letter from Walter W(ade) Smith, who has quite a lot of information on the Ballou family. We thank him for his letter and for the information therein contained. The letter follows:

P. O. Box 150
Moscow, Idaho
October 21, 1953

Calvin Gregory
Lafayette, Tennessee

My Dear Editor:

Three copies of your paper, ?Macon County Times,? were delivered to my P. O. Box this week. I have read them completely as they breathe a fine spirit of the middle South as I knew it half a century ago. I note particularly your data on the Ballou family, and your mention of my name as one of the sources of information on the Ballous. I was born in Pulaski County, Kentucky, and grew up with the Ballou descendants of James Ballou and ?Frankey? Jones. The ?first day?s work? I ever did for hire, I did for John Bell Jones, a nephew of Frances Jones Ballou. Yes, I am on ?This Side of the Flood,? in pretty good health, although retired some four years from the University where I taught for 21 years, closing my work there in June, 1949. I still do considerable ?speaking,? serve a Methodist church at Garfield, Washington, some 25 miles northwest of Moscow, as supply pastor. We drive over there every Sunday morning and visit among the members one day a week. Do some extra speaking for the University of Idaho, upon call, usually in the more distant parts of the State. Write some, and still gather genealogical information on my Smiths, and their kin.

It was a great pleasure to read your paper, and particularly the Ballou notes. The Ballous have intermarried with the Smiths and their kin, several times and I have busied myself betimes in gathering data on the genealogy of the Ballous, although none too succcessfully. I do have some data gathered from the Virginia State and County Records, and from the Bibles and traditions of the older members of the family. I find, however, that tradition is a very unworthy source of genealogical data. It is a great source of direction, and points the way towards many items that can be proven; but one cannot rely upon tradition solely as a basis for family history. Sometimes it is off one, two or three generations in point of time, and sometimes quite unreliable in point of person or place. However, we seek it at every turn when valid data is not at hand; but must yield always to the public record, the Tombstone or Bible Family Record when obtainable. This, of course, you already know; but I want you to know that I also know that, too.

I have quite a large volume of notes on the Ballou Family, much of which still unsupported tradition, some verified by public records, some by Bible records; but with much yet to be desired to complete the lineage of the family from the immigrant Ballou ancestor. I shall be glad to share with you, all that I have of either, or all. My knowledge of the Ballous begins with visits with my father, Martin Beaty Smith, to the home of Rev. Allen Ballou, at Burnside, Kentucky, about 1885 to 1889, when he died; then for three more years until we left Pulaski County, Kentucky, with mother or alone, meeting and knowing these Ballous and Jones. Later in life I began gathering data on my Smiths, and their married kin, and came upon them again. They are an interesting family, of very ancient origin. I have had inquires and help from many who, like me, were seeking data on this family, and I am glad to find you interested to the point of publication and research on the matter.

The Ballou Family is of French Huguenot origin, and dates far back into French history. The first of whom I have any data was Antoine Boileau, b. 1381, d. 1459, treasurer of the Royal Property at Nismes and Beaucaire; his son, Guillaume (William) Boileau (Ballou), b. 1420, d. 1494 married Elienette Bourdin, daughter of Jean Bourdin; issue, Antoine, Guilliaume, Jean, Madeliene, Nicholas, Agnes, and Jeanne. One of this family named Charles Boileau, Sqr. d. Castleman, born 1626, Counsellor at Nismes, 1652; was imprisoned in 1685 at St. pierre Ancise, at Lyons till he died January 17, 1697, married November 18, 1664 to Dlle Francoise des Vignolles, daughter of Jacques des Vignolles, who escaped into Switzerland and died at Geneva January 14, 1700. They left 22 children, several of whom took service with the English Army, etc., Ref. Huguenot Pedigrees; Charles E. Hart, London, 1928. In O?Harts Irish Pedigrees, Vol. 2, p. 464, there is mention of Huguenot Boileaus in Ireland, one Charles Boileau, son of Jacques Boileau 5th, Baron and Counsellor of Nesmes, France, etc., served in the English Army, Capt. of Infantry, settled in Dublin, had sons, Simon, Solomon, etc.

Evidently some of these Boileaus (Ballous) came in to England even before the terrible days of 1685. It was the revocation of the Edict of Nantes that seems to have sent the Huguenot Boileaus (Ballous) out of France instead of the French Revolution of 1798, etc., as tradition seems to indicate.

In March of 1941, a Mrs. George C. Lewis, (Marcia Moss Lewis), of 8 Summit Grove Avenue, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, also a
Ballou researcher, sent me data on early Ballous in Virginia. She found, that the first Ballou come to Virginia, was ?Lt. Col. William Ballou, who came to Virginia with the Kings Troops to protect the Colonists from the Indians, and remained. He married Dorothy Clarke, daughter of John Clarke. His will is on record in Henrico County, Virginia, Will Book II, p. 32 for April 5, 1678; sons mentioned, Leonard, William and Thomas.? Of this William Ballou, Jr. son of Col. William Ballou, she says, that his will, recorded in Henrico County, Virginia, Will Book, Vol. VI, p. 197, dated February 3, 1700, left ten children without naming them, evidently minors, etc., that his widow Dorothy Ballou, died soon after her husband, naming one son, Charles Ballou. That Charles Ballou died, will date January 17, 1726 and names wife, Tabitha; children, Charles Jr., Sarah, Michael, Phoebe and Mary. That Charles Ballou Jr. died Cumberland County, Virginia, 1767, will in Book II, P. 333; wife Temperance, and children William, Annie, Charles (3rd), Jesse, Thomas John and Mary Ballou.

From other sources I have the will of Thomas Ballou in Abermarle Co., Virginia, August 13, 1750; Wife, Jane, children, Thomas, Dorothy, Micha, and Jane Ballou. Same county, February 14, 1753, is will of Bennett Ballou; wife, Agnes, children, Leonard, Executor, brother John Ballou. Another will, Susanna Ballou, September 25, 1775; children, Robert, Ann, Charles, Thomas, Joseph, John Leonard, a grandchild, Leonard Patterson. Executor, Leonard Ballou, and witnesses, Joseph Ballou, Dianah Ballou and Robert Ballou, proven February 12, 1756.

Lt. Col. William Ballou, had grants of land in Henrico Co., Virginia, October 1, 1651, 406 acres on North side of Appomattox River near the falls. In this land grant he is called ?Major William Ballow.? Again he has a grant with Jerome Hame, February 17, 1652 for 1050 acres, in which he is called ?Lt. Col. Bellew,? Land Book III p. 185.

Now for what tradition has built up on the Ballou Family: ?One Leonard Ballou, from Ireland, a French Huguenot, who married Esther Meredith, daughter of Rhys Meredith, of Wales, came to Virginia, and left a son, Rice (Rhys) Meredith Ballou, born in Virginia early in the 1700?s, married a cousin named Ballou, and left a son, Leonard Ballou, born in Virginia somewhere on the James River about 1742.?

This Leonard Ballou is the one who is reputed upon best authority to have driven a herd of beef cattle to Philadelphia, during the early days of the Revolutionary War and to have died there of smallpox. I suspect that the actual confusion began here. His family is given as different by different traditions. The first one to come to me from the Kentucky Ballous, was: Children, Leonard, James Owen, Meredith, Elizabeth, Margaret, Susannah, Tamzon, Esther, Catherine and William Ballou. Of these children, Leonard Ballou was supposed to be a Baptist minister, born about 1762, married Sallie Wingfield, and had William, Charles, Thomas H., Robert and Joseph Ballou. James Ballou, the 2nd child, married Frances Jones and settled in Pulaski County, Kentucky. I have a good list of his descendants and it was from his children that we got our traditions. Owen Meredith Ballou was a Baptist minister born in Virginia, September 29, 1766. This I have from R. L. Ballou, Lawyer, etc., of Creston, N.C., in 1941. He then had access to the Bible of his great-great-grandfather, Owen Meredith Ballou. This R. L. Ballou, of Creston, N.C., said that Owen Meredith Ballou, was the son of Leonard Ballou who went to Philadelphia with a herd of beef steers and died of smallpox. He also says that Susan Ballou, daughter of Leonard Ballou, born in 1757, married John Rutherford, of Kings Mountain Fame, etc. Further R. L. Ballou, of Creston, N.C., also said that the widow of Leonard Ballou and a son, James Ballou, removed to Tennessee.

It is possible that our Ballou Lineage could stem from Leonard Ballou, son of Lt. Col. William Ballou, of English Army, etc., died 1678; but that would leave only about two generations of the traditional line to be correct to cover 90 years, 1652? to 1742? Of course, we haven?t all the details even by tradition, so must search further.

I say again I was glad to get your papers, and to learn that some one was still searching for the origin of the Ballous in America. There are a great many Ballous scattered about throughout the whole United States, and many have lost completely all connection with the parent stem of the family. It is well that some one who knows first hand some of the vital facts keep matter alive until this be settled and written up for permanent record. I have read the ?Ballou Family in America,? giving special attention to the family descended from Maturin Ballou of New England, and the fragments of the Ballou Family History from the Virginia Ballous up to about 1876. Some of this must have been misunderstood or reported badly; as it is not clear in many instances just who is the ancestor of what set of children.

I haven?t done much more than answer inquires on the Ballou Family since 1941, I, at that time, did about all I could to get a clear view of our Ballou cousins, as I am not a Ballou descendant, but have many Ballou cousins in Kentucky, Missouri and Indiana.

Father died in Pulaski County, Kentucky, August 9, 1889, and my mother, Melissa Annis Stephens Smith, removed in 1891 to Johnson County, Missouri. I went to High School at Holden, Missouri, married there in 1901, Margaret Eunice Winn, and had three sons. Mrs. Smith died after we came to Moscow, and I later married Elsie Riddle, from a Jefferson County, Tennessee family, which was intermarried with Tylers, Westers, Hauns and other East Tennessee families. Most of these families came from southern Virginia to East Tennessee, so the Stephens and Riddles have been neighbors for more than 150 years.

Another family that we knew to some extent, was that of Levi Jones, from Virginia, to Pulaski County, Kentucky, whose daughter, Frances (Franky) Jones, married Rev. James Ballou. We lived neighbors to Allen Jones, a son of this Levi Jones, and brother of Frances Jones Ballou.

I was educated (so to speak) at Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and preached and taught for several years, was in Kansas City about 8 years, went to California in 1924 and came to Moscow to teach in the University of Idaho in 1927, and was retired for age (70), June, 1949 as Prof. Emeritus in College of Education. I have been interested in the history of the Smiths and their kin since I was a boy. Our Smiths are from Rowan County, N.C., as are most of our intermarried kin. Stephens, from Henry County, Virginia, Hughes (grandmother) probably from Rowan County, N.C., Massey, from Rowan County, N.C., Lee (great-grandmother) from Virginia, (Cobb Hall Lees).

I shall look forward to another issue of your paper, with more Ballou information. If I can help you will gladly share with you all that I have gathered on that or any other family. May I hear from you in person if I can be of help? With sincerest best wishes, I am.

Most respectively,
WALTER W. SMITH.

We thank Prof. Smith for many items of information on the Ballou, Smith, Jones and other families. We shall be glad to have any information he may give us. Again we extend our sincere thanks.  
James Larkin Ballou
 

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