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101 POSSIBLE RELATION TO THIS WILLIAM COLLIER???
http://searches.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/ifetch2?/u1/textindices/C/COLLIER+1998+2025355+MESSAGE-BODY
Isearch-cgi 1.20.06 (File: 13)

John Pate wrote:

> I am interested in any information that anyone may have on
> William Collier. He was supposed to have been born in 1660
> in England, married Mary Eyers about 1682 and died in King
> and Queen County, Va in 1735.

John,

I have some information with those names but with different
combinations. Some of the dates I have are very suspect and
confusing. I'm going to have to re-search.

Vaughn

ROBERT COLLYER/COLLIER (1566??--1625)

Robert Collyer, son of Thurston, was born at Staffordshire, England,
in 1566 [This date can't be right if the marriage info is correct—
must be 1546] and died in 1625. He married Margery Straunge, widow, of
St. Botolph, Aldegate on February 3, 1569/70 [ London Marriage
Licenses, 1551-1869, pg 312]
Their children:

A. Charles Collyer was born about 1580 and married about 1614.
The was a cloth worker and merchant in London. He had four children,
two of which have been identified, William Collier and Mary Collier.

1. William Collier, the third child of Charles Collyer, was born
about 1625 in London, England and married Sarah or Mary Culliford.
William was a citizen and weaver in London. William took his family
and went to Virginia where his uncle, Isaac Collier was in York
County. William is mentioned in York County records in 1670. He
later moved to New Kent County where he joined the militia as an
officer. In 1675, he was named Lt. Colonel of that county. William
and Sarah had one son born in England just before they made the trip
to Virginia and three more born in America. They were the ancestors
of the Colliers of New Kent, Hanover, and King William Counties,
Virginia. Their children:

a. Charles Collier who was born in London, England in 1660
and died September 4, 1735 in Virginia and married Mary Eyers on April
21, 1682.
b. Sarah Collier.
c. John Collier.
d. William Collier Jr.

2. Mary Collyer.

B. John Collyer, of London, "Merchant and cloath worker", was born
in 1594 and died in December 1649. He married Regina, daughter of
Mrs. Anna Semiliano. His will, made December 18, 1649 and proved
January 8, 1650, directed that he be buried at Beddington, Surry and
gave 1/3 of his goods to his wife, Regina, 1/3 to his son, Charles and
gave the remaining 1/3, "to my brother, Isaac Collyer Sr., I forgive
E500 he owes me, to my nephew, Isaac Collier Jr., E15O." There were
several other bequests to relatives, in-laws and to the poor. The
executors named were his friend John Throgmorton; brother, Isaac
Collyer; and wife, Regina. He also stipulated that, "If my wife
leaves England at any time, my son, Charles is not to go with her; he
is to be brought up in English learning and the Protestant faith".
[VIRGINIA MAGAZINE, XXVIII, 130]

C. Mary Collyer was born about 1600. She married John Knight and
they had three children.

D. Isaac Collyer Sr. , our emigrant ancestor, is discussed in the
following section. 
Charles Collier
 
102 From G. Brown Goode's Virgina Cousins:

"was born at Porto Bello 1720-30, and removed about the middle of the century to a place on the Meherrin River, where he owned large tracts, probably in Lunenburg Co., and in or near what is now Charlotte Co. His plantation houses were occupied by Tarleton during his raid in 1776. After the Revolution in 1802 he removed with his family to South Carolina. Married Elizabeth, dau. of John W. Wyatt, of Gloucester Co., who was grandson either of Sir Francis Wyatt, Governor of Virginia, or more probably of Rev. Hawte Wyatt, his brother. Issue:-- " 
Cornelius Collier
 
103 3 Dec 1787 Charles and Dabney Collier chose Langston Bacon as guardian and Betsey chose Paul Carrington as guardian (so they were at least age 14, so born before 1773) [Source: Charlotte Co, VA Court Order Book 7 p144]. Langston Bacon is Betsy's guardian by 1792 when he makes his report so she is still under age. (Source: Charlotte Co, VA Court Order Book 9 p24.) (from Rubyann Thompson Darnell, Flower Mound TX) Dabney Collier
 
104 Per Mason County Ky court records concerning division of 3000 acre land grant of father Thomas, Dabney inherited 1/4 of the 3000 acres. The book History Of Kentucky And Kentuckians page 1621 reports that Dabney sold his 1/4 share of the 3000 acres and married twice and lived his later years in Nashville TN. Dabney Collier
 
105 Inherited 1/4 of 3000 acres from father Benjamin who had evidently died by the time the estate of his father, Thomas Collier of VA's estate was settled. Thomas Collier revolutionary soldier received 3000 acre land grant in Mason County KY, but never lived there. He left it to 4 sons: Benjamin, Dabney, John and Charles. Elizabeth Collier
 
106 Thomas M. Owen's Revolutionary Soldiers in Alabama:
COLLIER, JAMES. Died at his residence near the village, on Monday the 20th instant, after a severe illness of two weeks, Mr. James Collier, in the 77th year of his age. Mr. Collier was a native of Virginia, and at an early period of his life entered the Revolutionary Army. Through the whole of that arduous and protracted struggle for liberty, he manifested the most untiring zeal and unceasing devotion in the cause of his country. He was no less distinguished for his patriotism, than for high-toned honor and those bland and social virtues which endeared him to a large circle of relations and friends.

Overwhelming as is this melancholy bereavement to his worthy family, in which he shone as a most affectionate husband and father, and benevolent master, there is still for them great consolation in knowing that he developed strong hopes of future bliss, that flourish above the tomb, immortal and unfading. Many of his latest moments were spent in prayer; and he maintained throughout this trying interval that propriety which belonged to the character of a man of sense, and that elevated dependence upon a higher power which became a Christian.
Such were, as we have been enabled to sketch them, the life and death of our deceased friend; we see pictured in them the employments of a man bent earnestly and steadily upon the faithful discharge of the duties which pertained to the situation allotted to him by his Creator. No meritorious artifice to attract the popular applause, no disingenuous maneuvering, were perceptible in his character. These qualities rendered him firm and steady in his friendships. His loss will long be felt by the circle of relations whom he has left behind him; and his memory, as a soldier and a man, will be long and affectionately cherished by all to whom he was known.
How often, at the peaceful fireside of this revolutionary soldier, have we heard the tale of the deeds of other years! Even now, can we see, in fancy's eye, the grey-haired sire, traveling with increased emotion through the memorable battles of Gilford, Brandywine, Savannah and Eutaw Springs. His aged and failing eyes glisten again with the fire of youth! At the recollection of their resplendent glories, he springs forward from the venerable chair of age, and in the warmth of emotion, almost forgets, for the time, the lapse of years! But he is gone to the cold and silent tomb, moldering into dust, and mingling again with his mother earth. No more shall his spirit rejoice in the cannon's roar, or the music of the drum. Triana, Madison Co., Ala. Aug. 18, 1832.?Southern Advocate, Huntsville, Sept. 8, 1832.
Mrs. P. H. Mell has collected some additional details, and her sketch is given in full, although it contains some repetitions:
"James Collier a Revolutionary soldier, is buried on his plantation near Triana, Madison County, Alabama, about twenty miles from Huntsville.
"His wife is buried beside him and their monuments, with inscriptions, are now standing in a full state of preservation in the old family burying ground. The inscriptions are as follows:
" 'To the memory of
JAMES COLLIER,
who was born in Lunenburg Co. Va., Oct. 13th,
A. D. 1757, and died the 20th of August, A. D. 1832.
"And though after my skin worms destroy this body,
yet in my flesh shall I see God: whom I shall see for
myself and my eyes shall behold and not another."
To the memory of
ELIZABETH BOULDIN,
of Charlotte Co., Va., wife of James Collier, who was born the 13th of Feb., A. D. 1763, and died the 23rd of Feb., A. D. 1828.
"All flesh is grass, and all the goodliness thereof is as a flower of the field, for the wind passeth over it and it is gone and the place thereof shall know it no more."
"James Collier was the son of Cornelius Collier and Elizabeth Wyatt, of Lunenburg County, Va. He was descended from Charles Collier, of King and Queen County, Va., on his father's side, and his mother was nearly related to Sir Francis Wyatt, Colonial Governor of Virginia. It was the old flax wheel of his (James Collier's) cousin, Mary Collier, the ancestor of the late Prof. G. Brown Goode, which suggested insignia of the Daughters of the American Revolution. James Collier was wounded at the battle of Eutaw Springs by a sabre cut across his cheek, in a hand-to-hand encounter with a British soldier. He killed the soldier and carried the scar on his face to his grave. His brother, Wyatt Collier, was killed in the same battle when only a boy.
"James Collier married Elizabeth Bouldin, July 3, 1788, daughter of James Bouldin and Sally Watkins, of Charlotte County, Va. He was a large land owner in Lunenburg County and resided there until 1802, when he, with his little family, followed his father and other relatives to Abbeville District, South Carolina. He was a large planter in that State until 1818, when he followed his sons to the territory of Alabama, his older sons having settled in that part of the Mississippi territory, now Alabama, in 1812. He settled on a large plantation in Madison County, where he lived and died.
"His wife, Elizabeth Bouldin, was the daughter of James Bouldin, who was the oldest son of Colonel Thomas Bouldin of Colonial fame, who settled in Lunenburg (now Charlotte) County, Virginia, in l 744, coming from Pennsylvania. His wife was Nancy Clark, niece of Captain Richard Wood of the English navy. The family of Bouldins are noted for their intellect and their love for the legal profession. Virginia boasts there has never been a generation without a Judge, even to the present day. This couple left a large family of sons, but there were only four grandsons among, the grandchildren. Governor Henry Watkins Collier was a son of James Collier. He was closely connected with the politics of Alabama from 1822 until his death in 1855.
"The ancestry of James Collier is as follows:
(1) Charles Collier of King and Queen County, Virginia. One of his children,-
(2) John Collier, Sr., (1680-1735), who was married three times, by his third wife, Nancy Eyres, had issue, among others:
(3) Cornelius Collier, born 1725, married Elizabeth Wyatt in Gloucester County, Va., about 1750, lived in Lunenburg County, Va., was a soldier in the Revolution and moved to Abbeville District, South Carolina in 1788; he had four sons and one of them was?
(4) James Collier, the subject of this sketch. The facts of this article were furnished by his great-granddaughter Miss Elizabeth R. Benagh. James Collier is mentioned in the Memorial Record of Alabama, vol. ii p. 415."? Transactions of the Alabama Historical Society, Vol. iv, pp. 536-7.

Moved to South Carolina 1802 then to Alabama 1818 per Virgina Cousins by Goode. 
James Collier
 
107

THE A.E. HART BOOK THE "RICHARD CALLOWAY FAMILY" IN SPEAKING OF JOHN COLLIER OF 1742 WHO WAS MARRIED TO GRIZZELDA TAYLOR, SAID THAT JOHN OF 1742'S FATHER WAS A JOHN COLLIER A PROSPEROUS PLANTER. THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN JOHN COLLIER OF 1707. IT SAYS THAT JOHN OF 1707 HAD MANY SONS AND DAUGHTERS, ONE OF WHICH WAS A WILLIAM (THIS WOULD BE WILLIAM OF 1754) MOVED TO TENNESSEE AND WAS LOST TO ALL KNOWLEDGE OF THE KINDRED. THIS IS THE ONLY INDICATION OF WHO WAS WILLIAM OF 1754'S FATHER I HAVE FOUND. HOWEVER IT IS BORN OUT BY THE SEVERAL INDICATORS. FIRST THE QUESTION OF WHY WOULD JOHN OF 1707'S WILL NOT INCLUDE THIS CHILD WILLIAM IF HE WAS IN FACT A CHILD. THE REASON WAS THAT JOHN OF 1707'S WILL WAS DRAWN IN 1746 BEFORE WILLIAM OF 1754 WAS BORN, AS WAS THE CASE OF ANOTHER DOCUMENTED CHILD OF JOHN OF 1707---MARY....WHO THE VIRGINIA COUSINS BOOK SAYS WAS BORN IN 1756. NOTE THAT THIS JOHN OF 1707 DIED IN 1759.

FROM A.E. HART CALLOWAY FAMILY WRITE UP IN LDS LIBRARY.
"The Isaac Collier line,though lnteresting,has no special claim on me,for my descent is from the William Collier family Of 1670, whose members drifted. from the coast to King end Queen county, Va.,and thence to Hanover county,Va , ,where John Collier, grandfather of Mary A.Collier,was born and reared,a son of another John Collier, a prosperous planter with several ,sons,besides numerous daughters
(according to family tradition.) One of the brothers, William, moved to Tennessee and was lost to all knowledge of the kindred."

FROM Colonial Families of Southern States:
"CAPT. JOHN COLLIER (4--1.), of King and Queen Co., and later of Hanover Co., Va.; b. 1707. made will Sept. 26, 1749, pro. 1759, in which he names his sons, Thomas, John, and Joseph, daughters Elizabeth Ironmonger Collier, Frances and Sally; and in which he leaves "to my mother-in-law, Ann Collier, of King and Queen County, the part of that tract that was given me by my [p.150] grandfather,. Charles Collier, of King and Queen." He also names his step sister, Martha Games, and appoints George Morriss andDavid Crawford, executors. He served as an officer in a VirginiaRegiment under Admiral Vernon in the Carthagean expedition, 1740-42; and owned large estates in Isle of Wight and Surry Co.'s. He m. Elizabeth Meredith"

There is preserved the will of John Collier, Jr., of Hanover county, dated September 26, 1749, which names sons Thomas, John, Joseph, daughters Elizabeth Ironmonger Collier, Frances and Sally; "to my mother-in-law Ann Collier, of King and Queen county, the part of that tract that was given me my my grandfather Charles Collier, of King and Queen," sister-in-law Martha Gaines. appoints Geroge Morriss and David Crawford executors. Witnesses Thomas Harris, Stephen Harris and ----------- (name faded).

The original will is in the hands of Mrs. Walter S. Osborne, of Mason county, KY. She is descended from Thomas Collier, oldest son of John. Patrick Henry, as governor of the commonwealth, granted to Thomas Collier for military services, as captain in the Revolution, 3000 acres in Mason Co., KY, on a part of which some of his descendants live. He married Mary Dabney, of Hanover county.
Virginia Soldiers of 1776, Vol. 1 (Mike and Carolyn Chapman http://home.comcast.net/~gochapman/)


Other "John Colliers, Colyers" not placed but noted here for info:

Per Lyman Chalkley's work Vol III -Augusta County Va. court records page 403: 27th October, 1760. John Colyer's will----To wife Sisley; to son Alexander, 400 acres akjoining James Davis; to son John, place testator now lives on (infant); to son Moses, tract called Boyd's Entry; to son Aaron; to son (daughter?)Margaret. Executors, wife Sisley and James Gilmore. Teste: Jno. Wiley. Proved, 20th August, 1765, by witnesses. Cicely (her mark) qualifies, with Jas. Trimble, John Summers.

comment: If this is William of 1715's father, seems strange not mentioned in Chalkley will above.

THIS NEXT JOHN COLYER OF 1722 I HAVE NOT PLACED EXACTLY BUT DOES NOT APPEAR TO BE A PART OF THE LINE OF MY FAMILY OF JOHN COLLIERS ETC.

Will of John Colyer, Sr. 1722-1765 Oct 27th 1760 Proved 20th August 1765.
(John Colyer was born ca 1722, Augusta Co, VA)
To wife Sisely: to son Alexaner, 400 acres adjoining James David; to
son John, place testor now lives an (infant); to son Moses, , tract
called Boyd's entry; to son Aaron; to son (daughter) Margaret,
(Aaron's and Margaret' shares are not spe cified in the abstract). Esecutors;
Wife Sisly and james Gilmore Teste: Jno Summers. Jno Wiley. Proved
20th August 1765 by the witness. Cicely (her mark) qualifies with Jas.
Trimble. John Summers. WBK 3, 403, Original court records, Chalkey,

Vol III pg 90. John ColyerSr. married ca. 1743 Sisely ca. 1724 VA
1. Alexander ca 1744
2. John, jr. ca 1746
3. Moses ca 1748 m. 8/1/1769 Lunenburg, VA (lived lincoln kY ca
1790's) Nancy Blank (s)
4. Aaron Sr. 1760 Augusta VA; 1842 Lee Co VA; m. ca 1777 Rockbridge
VA; lived Buck Creek, SEminary, Turkey Cove lee Co VA; FRances
(Frankey/Eliz) ca. 1765; ca 1845 Turkey Cove Lee Co VA5. Margaret
ABout the same time that Aaron appears on tax lists in Lee Co VA; Wm.
Randolph Collier, Sr also appears. Then later ca. 1860 Lewis Collier
of LEE Co VA married Valera Collier d/o Martin Douglas Collier;
Lewis's father is given as Isaac Collier.
Sure do need some help with this bunch of Colliers. I have further
info down from these people and will happily share.

Marsil in NM
MRS MARSIL R CREECH




Per Dessie Simmons of Johnson City TN (editor for Johnson City historical society past 18 years (8/1/98) and co editor of book History of Washington Co. TN before 1800) her review of book in her possession by the Daughters of the American Revolution called Roster Of Soldiers Buried in Tn--shows a John Collier born 1732 in Pennsylvania that died in 1792 in TN. He was under Col Randolph's Regiment in North Carolina in 1782 in Randolph Co. N.C. Says that he was married to a Margaret and had sons named Thomas and John, Jr.


BELOW IS EMAIL OBTAINED FROM SEARCH OF ROOTSWEB.
CNJDR Isearch-cgi 1.20.06 (File: 25)

Dear Randy,

I am always curious when I see "John Collier" had a big plantation and seven sons in North Carolina.

Can you please tell me which county in NC and when.

If it is the John Collier in Guilford/Randolph County during the Rev. War, I want to make sure you don't get yours confused with 11mine." I have been arguing with sources (one live) for years, trying to seperate the two. I have finally done so, to my satisfaction and have documents to prove it. The two John's overlap in time somewhat, but yours stayed and mine moved to Greene County, TN in 1792 So everything after that date should be yours safely.

Mine was the Col. John Collier (1732-1823) born in Harrisburg (Paxtang/Paxton), PA, son of James and Susannah Dougan Collier. He moved to NC after his uncle, Thomas Dougan, Sr., (1763) by 1772 and lived there for 20 years. Any military connection with the Dougan family (and also a Thomas Johnston) will be mine. Col. John was in the NC militia and fought in the Battle of Guilford Courthouse. He was also a prosecutor of Tories and was persecuted in return. Fanning and Little burned his house down twice. One night he escaped with three bullet holes through his shirt. His wife was named Margaret.

Col. John also owned a lot of land. Much of it bought after confiscation from the Tories. After the war, much of it was taken away from him. In 1792 he had had enough and started over again in Tennessee.

One lady I corresponded with was convinced that she had been in the large house he had owned which was still standing. That was the large plantation which had been divided among 7 sons. That would be yours. My Col. John, had only two living sons. One died during the persecution of Fanning and LIttle. The sons of my Col. John came to Tennessee with him, John Jr, and Thomas

Mine lived on or near Deep River. The Dougans, his cousins, lived on Deep
River also and are buried in the Bell/Welborn Cemetery in Sophia, Randolph
County, North Carolina.

I have copies of 14 letters written among the members of the Dougan, Collier,
Johnston families from NC and SC back to their family in PA. They range from
1776 to 1828. That, plus some Bible records, county histories, etc. are my
proof.

Let me know if I can help you straighten them out. Sincerely,

Brenda Schwall GENEOBUG@aol. com

http://searches.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/ifetch2?/.../COLLIER+1997+5995529+MESSAGE-BOD 7/25/98[ColyerV2.FTW] 
John Collier
 
108
See Mt. Vernon Ky newspaper article under Charles Colyer, where it is stated that there were 6 brothers to Charles, 7 sons total.  
John Collier
 
109 1860 Rockcastle county KY census says he was a stone mason. John Collier
 
110 A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS, BY E. POLK JOHNSON, LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY VOL. III, PAGE 1621 PUBLISHED 1912 FOUND IN HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY:

"Captain Thomas Collier was a son of John Collier, )r., and Sarah Collier, his cousin and wife. John,Jr..was the son of John Collier, Sr., and a Miss Gaines, his second wife. John Collier, Sr., was the son of Charles and Mary Collier, and Charles Collier was born in Eng land about 1660. and resided in King and Queen county, Virginia." 
John Collier
 
111 COLONIAL FAMILIES OF THE Southern States of America
COLLIER FAMILY
page 150
5--3. Joseph, 1749 of South Crolina served with distinction in the Revolutionary War; he m. 12-15-1772 Amy Moseller, and had issue among others: 1. Meredith, m. Eliza Grey of Georgia; 2. Merrel, of Georgia; 3. Hiliary, m. Frances Quarlesy of Georgia. 4. Nancy m. John Talbert. 5. Sarah m. John S. Combs. 5. Ann m. ---- Farrar 7. Mary m. Samuel Boyd. 8. Tos. G. Abin 
Joseph Collier
 
112 1910 testified on behalf of Louisa Jane Colyer Confederate widow pension that he know Charles Granade Colyer. Richard G. Collier
 
113 Per civil war widow pension application, fought in Ky 6th cavalary. Per 1910 Pulaski County KY census, worked at railroad shops. Lived on Beecher St. Somerset KY. Richard G. Collier
 
114 I researched and compiled a book, ROBERT TERRELL COLLIER, His Ancestors and
Descendants. The search for Robert Terrell Collier's ancestors was through
Upshur and Nacogdoches counties in Texas, back to Georgia during its formative
years from directly after the Revolutionary War and through the Civil War, back
to Virginia during the Colonial days, then to England to a time prior to the
discovery of America, and finally to the family origin in France about 1200 AD.
The origin of the family name Collier was probably the village of Cauliéres
in France, and the first recorded use of the name was in a cartulary of
Selincourt Abbey in 1217 when one of the witnesses was "Frater Johannes de
Caouliéres". [ANTIQUARIES DEPICARDIE, Vol 40, Amiens; grant by Godefrid
deMiannay]. Johannes de Liéstes was born in the village of Liéstre, 44
kilometers southeast of Boulogne, Department of Pas-de-Calais,Artois, in
northwest France. He was the younger son of a baronial family who, as a young
man, was apparently transferred, by the mother abbey, to Selincourt Abbey, which
assigned him as a bailiff or magistrate to the management of the village of
Cauliéres. The evidence indicates that he was not a member of the clergy and the
designation "Frater" was probably a courtesy title because of his duties in
connection with the village of Cauliéres. Johannes adopted the name of the
village of his employment, Cauliéres, as his surname and became the founder of a
prolific family. He did not possess a feudal estate since the entire village
belonged to the abbey, so each of his sons had to acquire his own estate through
purchase, marriage, military service, or other means. As a result, the
Cauliéres family spread widely over ancient Picardy and Artois, but disappeared
from the village whose name they bore. A variety of coats-of-arms arose among
the various family branches. The forename Robert occurred repeatedly throughout
the Department of Pas-de-Calais in this region that our ancestor Robert Coliére
was born about 1453.
Robert Coliére was born near the end of the hundred year war between France
and England. The English kings controlled much of France. William the conqueror
was also the Duke of Normandy, so his heirs continued to rule that important
part of France. Eleanor of Aquitaine, heiress of that vast feudal estate that
included most of southwestern France, was divorced by King Louis VII of France
and married an English prince who became King Henry II of England. The English
kings held their French lands as vassals of the king of France while ruling
England in their own right. In theory their lands were part of the french
kingdom, but in practice they belonged to England. Fighting over feudal claims
went on for several centuries, but in the 14th century the trouble blazed into a
national war that lasted over a hundred years. For a time the war went badly for
the French. Then Joan of Arc changed the course of event, leading the French in
the defense of Orleans. She also recaptured the city of Reins where the French
kings were crowned, making possible the coronation of the Dauphin, heir to the
crown. The new king was lazy and did not follow up on the victories and later,
the English captured Joan and burned her at the stake. According to legend, one
of the English soldiers, who had come rejoice at the death of an enemy was heard
to cry out, "We are lost --we have burned a saint!" The English cause in France
was indeed lost. In the next few years, the French slowly drove back the English
invaders until only Calais remained in English hands. Calais, France was
controlled by England until 1558.
Robert Coliére de Darlaston was a contemporary of Christopher Columbus.
Both may have been in the service of Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand at the
same time. Both started a move to America at about the same time. Columbus
reached America first, but Robert's move was more lasting.
Prior to the reign of Ferdinand and Isabella, Spain consisted of many
little Christian kingdoms, all engaged in the re-conquest of Spain from the
Moors. Castile finally became the most powerful and in the 13th century managed
to confine the moors to a small area near Granada. The kings of Spain needed the
support of the middle class in this struggle and representatives of the towns
were admitted to the national council. When Isabella, the young Queen of
Castile, and Ferdinand, King of Aragon, fell in love and married they laid the
foundation of a united Spain and together they conquered Granada. A voluntary
association of the towns and the rural gentry to clear the country of brigands
was established in 1475 , with 7-year memberships for foreigners. This
brotherhood or fraternity, called the Hermandad consisted of horsemen in
proportion of one for every 100 families. In the war with Granada, the Hermandad
was employed as soldiers. Warriors from all over Europe swarmed into Spain to
help in this war. It is quite possible that Robert Coliére, as a foreign
legionnaire was among the foreigners, including Englishmen, who were welcomed to
this service in 1475.
In 1482, the Moorish Boabdil, deposed his father, who fled to Malaga, but
the advance of the forces of Ferdinand and Isabella forced him to resign the
task of defense into more war-like hands in 1483. It is not unreasonable to
speculate that, at the end of a 7-year contract, young Robert Coliére might have
been induced to accompany an English friend to England. There in Staffordshire,
as a young, former officer, he would have been introduced into good circles and
thus met and married Sir John Doddington's daughter Isabella.
Robert Coliére's arrival in England about 1482, long preceding the arrival
of other members of this family in England and Ireland. He settled in the
market town of Stone, in Staffordshire County, England. The town stands on the
river Trent and the Trent and Mersey Canal, 7 miles north northwest of Stafford,
7 miles south of Stoke-upon-Trent, and 137 miles from London. Robert was first a
taylor (tailor), then a draper (a dealer in cloth or in clothes), and then a
woolbuyer. Some of these staplers (dealers in staple goods) grew to great
wealth.
In the year 1503, two years before his death, Robert and Isabella moved to
Darlaston Manor. Robert and his son Thurston leased Darlaston Manor, in the
county of Staffordshire, from Thomas Whalley, then in 1537, Robert's son, James,
purchased the manor from Richard Whalley. Except for a brief time when Robert's
great grandson, James Collier, sold the manor to his father-in-law in 1597 and
until James's son, Francis, repurchased it from his grandfather in 1597, there
was a Coliére as Lord of Darlaston for over 180 years. A
great-great-great-great- grandson, James Coliére sold Darlaston to William
Jervis in 1685.
Robert Coliére de Darlaston's great-great-great-grandson Isaac
Collyer/Collier Sr. emigrated to America between 1653 and 1670, settling in York
Co., Virginia. Isaac was my wife's G-G-G-G-G- G-Grandfather.

The details I have are sketchy and there are a few improbable dates. I would
also like to contact researchers of the English Colliers.

Vaughn Ballard
[vballard@airmail.net]
8/7/99
 
Sir Robert Collier
 
115 --------------------------------
End of COLLIER-D Digest V98 Issue #8
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[ColyerV2.FTW]

8/8/98
http://searches.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/ifetch2?/u1/textindices/C/COLLIER+1998+134146855+MESSAGE-BODY
CNIDR Isearch-cgi 1.20.06 (File: 8)

Please post the following message.

Seeking information on origins and life of Stephen Collier born 1775,
probably in VA., lived about 30 years in TN.. Before 1810 moved to KY where
he died in Rockcastle Co. in 1844. He was an Elder in his church and had at
least 7 children.

--------------------------------
End of COLLIER-D Digest V98 Issue #8
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On Mon, 28 May 2001 12:45:26 EDT Grfmtf@aol.com writes:
> Greetings Wesley and or Dan;
>
> For years I have been researching a Stephen Collier that has been
> reported in
> Baptist Church records as a first cousin to Richard who was also a
> Baptist
> Preacher from about 1810 to 1850. Most of this time they were in
> the general
> area of Rockcastle Co..  
Stephen M. Collier
 
116 A history of Kentucky Baptists: from 1769 to 1885, including more ..., Volume 1
By John H. Spencer, Burrilla B. Spencer

Stephen Collier one of the early pastors of Mt Salem church was born in East Tennessee in 1772 He united with a church in his native country 1802 and was shortly afterward put into the ministry. He moved to Kentucky an ordained preacher not far from the year 1810 and settled in Rockcastle county He united with Flat Lick church in Pulaski county. Of this church Mt Salem and others he became pastor. He labored in the ministry in this field about thirty three years with much approbation and success. He died of a cancer on his lip which confined him to his house about a year May 12 1844. Of this good man John S Higgins who was long his co laborer in the ministry writes Stephen Collier was a large portly man of good common sense strong voice and a good gift of exhortation. With a burning zeal he proclaimed the gospel of God with great success in his own and several of the surrounding counties He was poor in the things of this world but rich in faith warning men and women everywhere he went to repent and believe the gospel  
Stephen M. Collier
 
117
A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS, BY E. POLK JOHNSON, LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY VOL. III, PAGE 1621 PUBLISHED 1912 FOUND IN HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY:

"Captain Thomas Collier was a son of John Collier, )r., and Sarah Collier, his cousin and wife. John,Jr..was the son of John Collier, Sr., and a Miss Gaines, his second wife. John Collier, Sr., was the son of Charles and Mary Collier, and Charles Collier was born in Eng land about 1660. and resided in King and Queen county, Virginia." 
Thomas Collier
 
118
This is the will of Thomas Collier, who bought land in
Charlotte Co. in March, 1767. His wife was Mary Frances Dabney-
both from Hanover Co. Thomas was the son of John Collier, of
Hanover Co.:

------- Charlotte County Will Book 1, 1765-1791. [Microfilm
obtained through interlibrary loan from the Virginia State
Library]. p. 403. Will of Thomas Collier. Executors: John
Collier, Jr., Benjamin Collier, John Daniel. Proved in court by
oaths of: Paul Carrington, esquire, John Collier, John Hutcheson.
Proved in Dec. court, 1787.

TEXT OF WILL:

I Thomas Collier of the County of Charlotte, sick and weak
of body, of sound mind and memory, knowing the Certainty of
Death, and the uncertainty of life, do make Constitute and
ordain, the following writing to be my last Will and Testament --
- I give and devise to my dear beloved wife Frances the
unmolested use and occupation of the tract of Land and
plantation, whereon I reside on the Horsepen Creek, during her
natural life; I also give to my said Wife, two negro Slaves,
named David and Sue during her natural life. I give and bequeath
to my said Wife Frances, my large bay mare, one third part of my
stock of Cattle, Hogs and Sheep, and as much of my household and
kitchen furniture, as she in her discretion think proper to take
for her Convenience, in which she is permitted to Judge. It is my
will and I do ----- and direct, that after the death of my Wife,
the tract of Land and plantation whereon I now live and [ ]
devised to my Wife for life be sold by my Executors for such
price as may be had, and that the Money arising therefrom, be
equally devided, between all my Daughters, meaning Elizabeth,
Ann, Patsey, and the Child my Wife is now pregnant with if it
should prove a Daughter.

-------- Also of interest:
Charlotte County Va. Will Book 2, p. 60. Division of slaves of
Thomas Collier. Dated Jan. 1788. To Charles Collier, Benjamin,
Betsey, John, Frances, Patsy, Anny, Dabney. Certified 1 Mar. 1795
by Thomas Williams, James Hamlett. Rec. 6 Apr. 1795. Mentions
that P. Carrington is guardian of Betsey Collier. [Microfilm from
Virginia State Library, through interlibrary loan].
 
Thomas Collier
 
119 William Sullivant of Charlotte County, Virginia d. 1781
Charlotte County, Virginia Will Book 1, pp. 287-289:
An inventory and appraisement of the estate of William Sullivant was created on August 11, 1781. Most items were for basic household and plantation use. Of interest were two slaves and a parcel of books. William's total estate was valued at 70,555.5 pounds (whereas one pound was valued at 1/200 of a pound specie). The inventory was appraised by Thomas Collier, Richard Collins and John Collier and was recorded in court on January 7, 1782.

Charlotte County, Virginia Will Book 1, pp. 356a-358:
An account current for the estate of William Sullivant was created by his administrator, Paul Carrington, on July 29, 1784. There are too many transactions to list but there were a few worth mentioning. Several people of interest were paid money including an Owen Sullivant, a Pleasant Sullivant and Leanna Sullivant's second husband, James Adams. The widow was allowed money for the making of four hats, there were also four pairs of shoes purchased for the children and at least one child attended Mr. Collier's school. Most of the money went towards the family's upkeep, such as paying people to carry their tobacco to market. The remaining funds were divided amongst the widow, who received one-third, and William's four sons namely Joel, Paul, W. P. and George Sullivant. Each son received a little over two pounds. The widow received almost five pounds. William's estate also received money from several sources. Of interest were cash received from Owen Sullivant for Margt. Hulet's estate and cash from the estate of Margt. Sullivant. It also appears that William had a 1/9 stake in some tobacco made in 1780. Perhaps this was part of an inheritance? This account current was witnessed by Joel Watkins, James Bouldin, Wm. Morton and was recorded in court on August 2, 1784. There were also a few Perrins mentioned in the accounting, namely George, Samuel and Josephus. 
Thomas Collier
 
120 COLONIAL FAMILIES OF THE Southern States of America
COLLIER FAMILY
page 150
CAPT. THOMAS COLLIER (5--1),of Charlotte Co., Va., b. 1740 d. 1789; m 1703; he received a grant of 282 acres in BrunswickCo.; served with distinction in Braddock's Campaign, and in theRevolutionary War; was granted by Gov. Patrick Henry, for mili-tary services, as Capt. in the Revolution, 3,000 acres in Mason Co.,Ky., on a part of which some of his descendants are yet living; m. Mary Dabney, of Hanover Co., Va.,

Thomas Collier of Hanover Co. buys 367 acres of land in Charlotte Co. from Abraham Martin and wife, Betty, of Charlotte Co. on 2 Dec 1766 for 143 pounds, on main branch of Horsepen Creek. Witnesses: Saml Perrin, Joseph Crenshaw and William Martin. Recorded 2 March 1767. (Source: "Charlotte County, Virginia 1765-1771 Deed Books 1 and 2" by Joanne Lovelace Nance.) NOTE: Thomas is of Hanover Co. when he buys this land and Joseph Crenshaw (probably his father-in-law) is a witness. (source: Rubyann Thompson Darnell, Flower Mound TX)

In 4 Nov 1771 Thomas and Frances Collier sell to Joseph Collier all of Charlotte Co. (Charlotte Co, VA Deed Book D3, p11-12) 177.5 acre tract in Charlotte Co., for 71 pounds 10 shillings, on main branch of Horsepen Cr. and bounded by patent line, Mays. Frances relinquished her dower. No witnesses signed.

I believe the Thomas Colliers above are the same Thomas Collier who wrote his will in Charlotte Co, VA 18 Sept 1787, probated 3 Dec 1787 (Will Book 1:402-402a). Thomas left to his wife Frances, for her natural life, the "plantation whereon I now reside on Horsepen Creek" and 2 slaves David and Sue and household items and stock of her choosing. At her death the plantation to be sold and money to go to daughters. His wife was expecting a child because he bequeaths a daughter's portion if it is a girl or a son's portion if it is a boy. He names daughters: Elizabeth, Anna, Patsey; sons Benjamin, John, Charles and Dabney. His sons John and Benjamin and friend John Daniel are Executors. Executors are to sell his 517 acres in Halifax Co, VA and money is to go to daughters. The land in Fayette County, KY to go to sons. Inventory and appraisement (Will Book 2:59a abstracted by Bel Hubbard Wise) taken 26 Dec 1787, recorded 6 Apr 1795. Division Jan 1788: Charles Collier, Benjamin Collier, Betsey Collier, John Collier, Frances Collier, Patsey Collier, Anny Collier and Dabney Collier. Mathew Burt did not put his signature on the report as he removed to State of South Carolina and is now dead. Recorded 6 Apr 1795. Division of Thomas' estate (Will Book 2:137b abstract by Bel Hubbard Wise) among his orphans: Benjamin Collier negro Phill, John Collier negro Rachel; Betsey Collier negro Sarah and child Ben, Charles Collier negro Hannah, Dabney Collier negro Abraham, Anny Collier negro Dilley, Patsey Collier negro Aggy, Frankey Collier negroes Any and Moses. Recorded 4 Feb 1799.

3 Dec 1787 Charles and Dabney Collier chose Langston Bacon as guardian and Betsey chose Paul Carrington as guardian (so they were at least age 14, so born before 1773) [Source: Charlotte Co, VA Court Order Book 7 p144]. Langston Bacon is Betsy's guardian by 1792 when he makes his report so she is still under age. (Source: Charlotte Co, VA Court Order Book 9 p24.)

Then in Charlotte Co, VA Order Book 9 (1792-1794) p122-124, 126 John Collier, guardian of Betsy Collier, orphan of Benjamin Collier deceased, reports account.
Charlotte Co, VA Order Book 10 p240 dated 9 Nov 1796 is court case Langston Bacon, guardian of Dabney, Anne, Patsey and Frankey Collier infants, Betsey Collier, John Collier and John Collier, guardian to Betsey Collier, dau of Benjamin Collier, in chancery vs Frances Collier widow of Thomas Collier. Both of these Order Books are abstracted by Joanne Lovelace Nance, 1989 in her "Charlotte County, Virginia Eighteenth Century Orphans and Other Children." I have not actually seen these case papers, if there are any, to know what the issue was.

Thomas Collier's executor (Chesley Daniel, Executor of John Daniel deceased) sells land on both sides of big Horsepen Creek, 190 acres, after the death of Thomas' wife Mrs. Frances Collier, to Philip Goode 4 Feb 1815 and recorded 7 May 1815. (Charlotte Co, VA Deed Book D13, p105-106)

Benjamin Collier married Sarah Gains Collier, daughter of John Collier, bond dated 15 Nov 1787 and married 20 Nov by Rev. John Williams (Source: "Marriage Bonds and Minister's Returns of Charlotte County, Virginia 1764-1815" by Catherine Lindsay Knorr, 1951). Benjamin's will (Will Bk 2:16b abstract by Bel Hubbard Wise in "Charlotte County, Virginia Will Book 2 1791-1805") written 28 April 1791 with codicil 22 May 1791 probated 3 Oct 1791: wife Sarah Gains Collier negro Stephen; to daughter Elizabeth lands in Kentucky on south side of Ohio River devised to me by will of my father Thomas Collier and slaves Phil and Dinah, also to dau Elizabeth that due me from estate of my deceased brother Charles being in no manner disposed to submit to the establishment of his nuncupative will; brother Dabney Collier; sister Betsey a double portion; to "Unkle Joseph Collier" title to 440 in Halifax on Spider Creek. Executors friends John Collier, Paul Carrington Junr and James Hamblett. Inventory and appraisement of estate recorded 5 Dec 1791 (Will Book 2:17b).

I don't know who this John Collier is, found in Charlotte Co, VA Will Book 2:49 (abstract by Bel Hubbard Wise) but believe it may be an older John Collier: nuncupative will 8 Dec 1793 probated 2 June 1794 Edgefield County, South Carolina. Mother all estate during her natural life then to his brothers and sisters [none named]. Witnesses: Joseph Collier, Amey Collier and Nancy Collier.

Therefore, I have Thomas Collier's family is: Thomas born 1740s marr before 4 Nov 1771 Frances Crenshaw, children (order listed in his will): Elizabeth 'Betsy' (of age in 1796), Anna, Patsey, unborn child Frances 'Frankey' born 1787, Benjamin (d betw May-Oct 1791), John (d after the 1796 chancery suit or went to KY as some think), Charles (b bef 1773, d pre May 1791), Dabney (b bef 1773). Thomas may well have married Mary Dabney first, as your source states, but he was married to Frances by 4 Nov 1771 when they sold land. Since Hanover marriages aren't extant this is all we have. -- -- Rubyann Thompson Darnell 3/31/03 Flower Mound TX 
Thomas Collier
 
121 G. Goode's Virginia Cousins:

"CAPT. THOMAS COLLIER, of Charlotte Co., Va., a soldier in Braddock's campaign and the Revolution, took up 282 acres in Brunswick Co. in 1763, and for public services was granted 3,000 acres in Mason Co., Ky., to which his descendants removed. Married Miss Dabney, of Hanover Co" 
Thomas Collier
 
122


See file at Church of Latter Day Saints http://www.familysearch.com file (AFN:P7FK-BL) 
William Collier
 
123 POSSIBLE RELATION TO THIS WILLIAM COLLIER???
http://searches.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/ifetch2?/u1/textindices/C/COLLIER+1998+2025355+MESSAGE-BODY
Isearch-cgi 1.20.06 (File: 13)

John Pate wrote:

> I am interested in any information that anyone may have on
> William Collier. He was supposed to have been born in 1660
> in England, married Mary Eyers about 1682 and died in King
> and Queen County, Va in 1735.

John,

I have some information with those names but with different
combinations. Some of the dates I have are very suspect and
confusing. I'm going to have to re-search.

Vaughn

ROBERT COLLYER/COLLIER (1566??--1625)

Robert Collyer, son of Thurston, was born at Staffordshire, England,
in 1566 [This date can't be right if the marriage info is correct—
must be 1546] and died in 1625. He married Margery Straunge, widow, of
St. Botolph, Aldegate on February 3, 1569/70 [ London Marriage
Licenses, 1551-1869, pg 312]
Their children:

A. Charles Collyer was born about 1580 and married about 1614.
The was a cloth worker and merchant in London. He had four children,
two of which have been identified, William Collier and Mary Collier.

1. William Collier, the third child of Charles Collyer, was born
about 1625 in London, England and married Sarah or Mary Culliford.
William was a citizen and weaver in London. William took his family
and went to Virginia where his uncle, Isaac Collier was in York
County. William is mentioned in York County records in 1670. He
later moved to New Kent County where he joined the militia as an
officer. In 1675, he was named Lt. Colonel of that county. William
and Sarah had one son born in England just before they made the trip
to Virginia and three more born in America. They were the ancestors
of the Colliers of New Kent, Hanover, and King William Counties,
Virginia. Their children:

a. Charles Collier who was born in London, England in 1660
and died September 4, 1735 in Virginia and married Mary Eyers on April
21, 1682.
b. Sarah Collier.
c. John Collier.
d. William Collier Jr.

2. Mary Collyer.

B. John Collyer, of London, "Merchant and cloath worker", was born
in 1594 and died in December 1649. He married Regina, daughter of
Mrs. Anna Semiliano. His will, made December 18, 1649 and proved
January 8, 1650, directed that he be buried at Beddington, Surry and
gave 1/3 of his goods to his wife, Regina, 1/3 to his son, Charles and
gave the remaining 1/3, "to my brother, Isaac Collyer Sr., I forgive
E500 he owes me, to my nephew, Isaac Collier Jr., E15O." There were
several other bequests to relatives, in-laws and to the poor. The
executors named were his friend John Throgmorton; brother, Isaac
Collyer; and wife, Regina. He also stipulated that, "If my wife
leaves England at any time, my son, Charles is not to go with her; he
is to be brought up in English learning and the Protestant faith".
[VIRGINIA MAGAZINE, XXVIII, 130]

C. Mary Collyer was born about 1600. She married John Knight and
they had three children.

D. Isaac Collyer Sr. , our emigrant ancestor, is discussed in the
following section. 
William Collier
 
124 William H. Collier, a substantial citizen of Miller Township, Gentry County who is a successful farmer and stockman was born in Gentry County, Dec. 12, 1864, and is a son of William and Sarah (Campbell) Collier. William Collier was a soldier in the Union army and was killed in battle.
William H. Collier, the subject of this sketch, has been engaged in farming and stock raising since early life. He first bought 40 acres of land and afterwards bought more land as opportunities afforded and conditions favored until he is now the owner of 570 acres of productive and well improved land which is considered one of the best farms in Gentry County. Here he has been successfully engaged in farming and stock raising for many years. Mr. Collier married Anna McColloch, a daughter of Porter and Sarah Ann (Reese) McColloch, natives of Indiana.


History of Davies and Gentry Counties Missouri
Historical Publishing Company Topeka-Indianapolis 1922
Pages 661-662 
William Henry Collier
 
125 Died in the revolutionary war battle of Eutaw Springs Wyatt Collier
 
126
Son of Thomas Collier according to Mason County Court records concerning inherited 3000 acre land grant seems to indicate this John died early but had heirs who got his part of father Thomas land grant. This would mean John Colyear of Lousivlle is different. 
John Collier (Colyear, Colyer)
 
127 It is an educated guess that John Collier son of Thomas Collier is the one that married Mary Polly Blevins in Pulaski County Ky in 1806 and appears in Louisville Ky in 1820-1850. Note that Thomas Collier signs oath of allegiance in Henry County VA in 1777. Note that Mary Polly Blevins father Samuel was from Henry County VA and moves to Lousiville Ky after residing a while in Lincoln County Ky about 1800. John Collier (Colyear, Colyer)
 
128 Name: George Arterburn
Birth Date:
Birthplace:
Age:
Spouse's Name: Serena Colyear
Spouse's Birth Date:
Spouse's Birthplace:
Spouse's Age:
Event Date: 22 Dec 1836
Event Place: Jefferson, Kentucky
Father's Name:
Mother's Name:
Spouse's Father's Name: John Colyear
Spouse's Mother's Name:
Race:
Marital Status:
Previous Wife's Name:
Spouse's Race:
Spouse's Marital Status:
Spouse's Previous Husband's Name:
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: M00574-7
System Origin: Kentucky-EASy
GS Film number: 482706
Reference ID: bk 2 p 197
 
John Collier (Colyear, Colyer)
 
129 Name: John Fitcher
Birth Date:
Birthplace:
Age:
Spouse's Name: Matilda Colyear
Spouse's Birth Date:
Spouse's Birthplace:
Spouse's Age:
Event Date: 21 Dec 1837
Event Place: Jefferson, Kentucky
Father's Name:
Mother's Name:
Spouse's Father's Name: John Colyear
Spouse's Mother's Name:
Race:
Marital Status:
Previous Wife's Name:
Spouse's Race:
Spouse's Marital Status:
Spouse's Previous Husband's Name:
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: M00561-2
System Origin: Kentucky-EASy
GS Film number: 817875
Reference ID:  
John Collier (Colyear, Colyer)
 
130 Name: William Arterburn
Birth Date:
Birthplace:
Age:
Spouse's Name: Mahala Colyear
Spouse's Birth Date:
Spouse's Birthplace:
Spouse's Age:
Event Date: 25 Dec 1835
Event Place: Jefferson, Kentucky
Father's Name:
Mother's Name:
Spouse's Father's Name: John Colyear
Spouse's Mother's Name:
Race:
Marital Status:
Previous Wife's Name:
Spouse's Race:
Spouse's Marital Status:
Spouse's Previous Husband's Name:
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: M00574-7
System Origin: Kentucky-EASy
GS Film number: 482706
Reference ID: bk 2 p 169 
John Collier (Colyear, Colyer)
 
131 http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=77308105

Birth: Nov. 6, 1923
Death: Nov. 13, 1992
Decatur
Wise County
Texas, USA

FORT WORTH - Carl Otis Collyer, who worked in the grain industry before retiring, died Friday at Willow Springs Golf Course near Decatur. He was 69.

Funeral will be at 2 p.m. Monday at Edge Park Methodist Church, where he was a charter member.

Masonic graveside service will follow in Laurel Land Memorial Park.

The family will receive friends from 7 to 9 tonight at Harveson & Cole Funeral Home.

Mr. Collyer had worked in the grain industry from 1948 until his retirement in January 1991. He had continued to work part time after his retirement. He was an Army veteran of World War II.

Mr. Collyer was a charter member of South Hills Masonic Lodge 1389 and was past patron of Mathis 874 and Dimmett 819. He was also a member of the Order of the Eastern Star, South Hills 835. He was a member of the Fort Worth Transportation Club.

The family suggests that memorials be made to the Order of the Eastern Star Home, 1111 E. Division St., Arlington 76011.

Survivors: Wife of 46 years, Alice Hays Collyer of Fort Worth ; two daughters, Mary C. Faherty of Fort Worth and Patricia C. Hatchel of Hayward, Calif.; two sons, John W. Collyer of Arlington and David C. Collyer of Saginaw; sister, Esther C. Grimmett of Council Grove, Kan.; and six grandchildren.

Fort Worth Star-Telegram (TX)
Date: November 15, 1992

Addition info submitted by Becky Doan.  
Carl Otis Collyer
 
132 Birth: Aug. 28, 1875
DeKalb County
Missouri, USA
Death: Sep. 21, 1926
Emporia
Lyon County
Kansas, USA

Son of Angeline and Bluford Collyer. Married to Verna Leona Mechtley. 2m to Grace Simmons.

Family links:
Spouse:
Verna Leona Mechtley Collyer (1892 - 1926)

Children:
Esther Emelie Collyer Grimmett (1919 - 2006)*
Carl Otis Collyer (1923 - 1992)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Maplewood Memorial Lawn Cemetery
Emporia
Lyon County
Kansas, USA
Plot: 12 - 61 - 5 
Charles Otis Collyer
 
133 Birth: Aug. 28, 1919
Emporia
Lyon County
Kansas, USA
Death: Apr. 21, 2006
Council Grove
Morris County
Kansas, USA

Married to Olen Harley Grimmett

Family links:
Parents:
Charles Otis Collyer (1875 - 1926)
Verna Leona Mechtley Collyer (1892 - 1926)

Spouse:
Olen Harley Grimmett (1916 - 1962)*

Sibling:
Esther Emelie Collyer Grimmett (1919 - 2006)
Carl Otis Collyer (1923 - 1992)*

*Calculated relationship

Inscription:
Mom

Burial:
Greenwood Cemetery
Council Grove
Morris County
Kansas, USA
Plot: S9 
Esther Emilie Collyer
 
134 William Collier was a soldier in the Union army and was killed in battle.  William Collyer
 
135 From website of Jean Colyer Grumbling: this Power of Attorney of son Alexander Colyar (son of William) which states that William Colyar and wife Nancy may have been living in Pulaski County Kentucky at the date of their death :

Power of Attorney dated February 26, 1839 reads as follows:

Know all men by thesse present that I, alexander Colyear of the County of Franklin and State of Tennessee hereby nominate, constitue and appoint my son, George T. Colyer of said county and state, my true and lawfull Attorney in fact for me and in my name to do and attend to all business I have any interest in in the state of Kentucky and more particularly to ask for, receive from and receipt for all money coming to me from the estate of my deceased Father, William Colyear late of the County of Pulaski and state of Kentucky or from the estate of my deceased mother, Nancy Colyear of said county and state and my said Attorney is also hereby authorized to bring suit or suits as he may think proper for the recovery of the same or to compromise the same in such way as he may think best and to give such receipts in my name as may be necessary hereby satisfying and confirming all the acts of my said Attorney may do in pursuance of this poser the same as if I was present and done the same myself. Given under my hand and seal this 26th day of February 1839.
Alexander Colyear (his mark) ?
State of Tennessee
Franklin County
I, John R. Paterick(?)an acting Justice of the Peace in and for the county and state aforsaid hereby certify that Alexander Colyear personally appeared before me this day and acknowledged the within power of Attorney to be his act and deed for the purpose therein expressed.
Given under my hand and seal this 26th day of February, 1839.
John R. Patrick
Justice of the Peace
State of Tennessee
Franklin County
I, William W. Brazelton, clerk of the County Court of said County certify that John R. Patrick is and was at the time of making the above (unreadable) an acting Justice of the Peace in and for said County duly commissioned, legally qualified as such and entitled to (unreadable) and credit in all of his official acts.
In Witness whereof I have here unto set my hand and affixed my seal of office at office, the 26th day of February, A.D.1839
William W. Brazelton, Clerk
State of Tennessee
Franklin County
I, Wallis Estill (?) Jr., chariman and presiding magistrate of the county court of said county certify that William W. Brazelton whose name is signed to the foregoing certificate is and was Clerk of said county of the time of signing the same and that his attestation is in due form of Law and sealed with the county seal. Given under my hand and seal this 26th day of February A.D. 1839.
W. Estill Jr. Chairman of Franklin County Court
(followed by another certification by Will Fawcett!


Copy of Power of Attorney, now on file with Jean Colyer Grumbling.POA located in Book 10, Page 147.
"Tennessee" by Moore, pg. 102 
Alexander Colyar
 
136 Selected Papers From The 1989 And 1990 George Rogers Clark Trans-Appalachian Frontier History Conferences NPS Logo

The Social World of Middle Tennessee, 1780-1840
David C. Hsiung
University of Michigan

"The combination of fertile land and population growth led to prodigious agricultural development, which was commented upon by travelers and residents alike. Anne Newport Royall passed through the Nashville region in 1817. "[I]t is an open plain of uninterrupted good land; and the farmers raise corn, tobacco and pumpkins in great abundance. They rear great numbers of hogs and horses, and have a great many distilleries in operation. In this way they convert their surplus produce into cash." [15] Emigrants to the area, even as late as 1829, were not disappointed with their situation. "I have every fine prospect of a crop," wrote Alex Colyar from Franklin County, south of Nashville, "and I do believe that there is a better incouragement here for a farmer to bee indoustrous than any place I ever saw[.] [P]roduce sels here for cash[;] there is great deal of cotton raised her... [W]e are verry well satisfied with our move." [16]"
16. Alex Colyar to James Sevier, 30 June 1829, in Washington County Court Records, Box 75:2 "Circuit Court 1820 Civil/Criminal," Archives of Appalachia, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee. 
Alexander Colyar
 
137 According to : Notable men of Tennessee: Personal and genealogical, with portratis, Volume 1
edited by John Allison page 64,

He was a prominent member of the Nashville Methodist Episcopal Church. 
Arthur St. Clair Colyar
 
138 Concerning the lawyer who schooled Arthur St. Clair Colyar to become a lawyer in Winchester TN, Col Micah Taul:

Micah Taul (May 14, 1785 - May 27, 1850) was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky, grandfather of Taul Bradford.

Born in Bladensburg, Maryland, Taul moved to Kentucky with his parents in 1787. He attended private school. He studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1801 and commenced practice in Monticello, Kentucky. He served as clerk of Wayne County Courts in 1801. He served as a colonel of Wayne County Volunteers in the War of 1812.

Taul was elected as a Democratic-Republican to the Fourteenth U.S. Congress (March 4, 1815-March 3, 1817). He declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1816. He resumed the practice of law. He moved to Winchester, Tennessee, in 1826 and continued the practice of law. He moved to Mardisville, Alabama, in 1846 and engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death there on May 27, 1850. He was interred on his plantation at Mardisville.

It if of interest to note that Mr. Taul started in Monticello Ky so near the place and time that Col Arthur St. Clair Colyar's uncle, John Colyer was settling very close on the banks of the Cumberland River in current Somerset Ky. Did Micah Taul know John Colyer in Somerset before moving to Winchester TN and schooling John Colyer's nephew ? 
Arthur St. Clair Colyar
 
139 [ColyerV2.FTW]

Subject moved with parents to Franklin County, c.1828; after leaving father?s farm




From the Procedings of the Bar Association of Tennessee.

REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON OBITUARIES
AND MEMORIALS,?
I-Ion. Foster V. Brown, President: The Special Committee
appointed to draft memorials of the members who have died
since the former meeting, to be inserted in the published pro-ccedings
of the Tennessee Bar Association, beg leave to submit
the following :
ARTHUR ST, CLAIR COLYAR. ?
Col. Arthur St. Clair Colyar was born in a dwelling sit-uated on the banks of the historic Nolachucky River, in Washington County, seven miles west of Jonesboro, June 23, 1815, and died at Nashville, December 13, 1907. His long life, therefore, extended over a period of more than 89 years. During this lapse of time, beginning almost with the infancy of the country, what a kaleidescope of change passed before his discerning eyes !
When he was about nine years old his father, Alexander
Colyar, removed to Hillsboro in what is now Franklin County, -and,
as the father was a farmer, Arthur began industrial life
as a plow boy, and received only such education as could be
had in a pioneer country. -At the age of ?22 he entered the office of Col. Micah Taul, of Winchester, as a law student. In 1846 he obtained his license and formed a partnership with W. P. Hickerson, at Winchester. Here he soon made a reputation which encouraged him to venture into wider fields ; he removed in a few years to Winchester, and formed a partnership with
his kinsman, A. S. Marks, who was afterwards Governor, and
with John Frizzell, who afterward became a prominent man.
Col. Colyar?s public spirit led -him into active politics, State and National. He was a member of the? national convention in 1860, which nominated Bell and Everett for President and
Vice-President respectively, on ?the Whig ticket, and made an active canvass in favor of the ticket in the hope of saving the Union. He opposed secession, but at the parting of the ways .

he cast his destiny with the South. He was elected to the Confederate Congress, in which he served with ?the same zealand energy that always characterized the man. After the Civil \Var he settled at Nashville and practiced law, at one time in partnership with Henry S. Foote, and at other times alone, or in association with various other attorneys. *
A fen- years after the close of the war he came connected as stockholder, director and president, of the Tennessee Coal and Railroad Railroad Company.
afterward the Tennessee Coal, Iron &
Railroad Company. He was not especially gifted as a
business man, but by his efforts he saved the company from wreck, and so inspired the financial world with his confidence in the industry that it was placed on .he way to a success that has finally brought it to a very high place among the industries of the country. About this time he was very aggressive
in his fight against a ring rule in the city of Nashville, which resulted in the city being placed in the hands of a receiver and in its complete relief from its distressing condition.

In 1881 he took charge-of the American, a leading paper throughdut the State.
His last important work was of a historic and ?literary
character, and in this, as a fitting climax to his laborious and zealous life, he left behind him the fruit of years of painstaking labor.
Nothing that he ever did was perhaps more pleasing and gratifying to him than his authorship of the "Life and Times of Andrew Jackson", which is truly a monument to his industry in his old age.

Col. Colyar was always prominent as a lawver especially
as an advocate, being eloquent, strong in debate, and forceful in pursuit of what was right. He was a participant in many of the most important suits in both State and Federal Courts.
Among other important cases, he represented the State in the
United States Supreme Court in the boundary line case between Virginia and Tennessee, which he won in 1893.

One of Col. Colyar?s most pronounced characteristics was his strong and enthusiastic interest in everything pertaining to public well-being and moral welfare. He was in deep sympathy with everything tending to the material prosperity of the country, and the intellectual, moral and religions culture of society, and was found among the active promoters of schools, colleges and churches, and was an ardent advocate of the establishment and construction of railroads,manufactories, mines and commercial and financial enterprises. He was an uncompromising? friend of law and order, sobriety and
purity -in individuals and government. He was a total abstainer and was the author of the Four Mile Law, one of the:
most unique and successful bits of legislation that the country has known. His courage was almost unlimited. Like all positive
characters he occasionally fell into mistakes of judgment,
and was sometimes criticised even when he was in the right.
As might be expected of such an one, he sacrificed himself, so far as public office was concerned, and died a poor man, being in active practice almost to the end of his days. The objects and purposes of the Bar Association fell naturally in line with
Col. - Colyar?s instincts and principles, for whatever organization
tended or purposed to cultivate right dealing, right thinking and professional ethics could not fail to meet with his warm and enthusiastic sympathy and support To the end of his life these things were his guilding stars.


[Collierj.ftw]

Arthur St. Clair Colyar came from a poor family which eventually moved to Franklin co., Tennessee. He was self-educated and studied law. He maintained a law office in Nashville but did not live in that city until 1866. (His son, John B. Colyar, wrote A Boy's Opinion of General Lee). A Whig, he became a Constitutional Unionist and opposed immediate secession. In 1863, he risked his life by defending Tennessee Unionists who had been unlawfully arrested. He was elected to the second House in May, 1864. He served on the Ways and Means Committee, generally supported the administration, and favored extending the tax-in-kind. He was a staunch opponent of any special priveliges for Southern corporations. Along with John B. Baldwin of Virginia, he tried to pressure Congress into negotiations with the North even before the Hampton Roads meeting. After the war, Colyar became an important Democratic party leader but lost the race for governor in 1878. Colyar was an active lawyer who wrote for the Confederate Veteran. He also reorganized the Tennessee Coal and Railroad Company and became its president. He was considered a conservative because of his 1867 appeal to allow the freedman the vote. From 1881 to 1884, he edited the Nashville American. He also wrote the Life and Times of Andrew Jackson. He died in Nashville December 13, 1907.

from Biographical Dictionary of the Confederacy
Jon L. Wakelyn
Westport, CT 1977
Arthur St. Clair Colyar came from a poor family which eventually moved to Franklin, Tennessee. He was self-educated and studied law. He maintained a law office in Nashville but did not live in that city until 1866. (His son, John B. Colyar, wrote A Boy's Opinion of General Lee). A Whig, he became a Constitutional Unionist and opposed immediate secession. In 1863, he risked his life by defending Tennessee Unionists who had been unlawfully arrested. He was elected to the second House in May, 1864. He served on the Ways and Means Committee, generally supported the administration, and favored extending the tax-in-kind. He was a staunch opponent of any special priveliges for Southern corporations. Along with John B. Baldwin of Virginia, he tried to pressure Congress into negotiations with the North even before the Hampton Roads meeting. After the war, Colyar became an important Democratic party leader but lost the race for governor in 1878. Colyar was an active lawyer who wrote for the Confederate Veteran. He also reorganized the Tennessee Coal and Railroad Company and became its president. He was considered a conservative because of his 1867 appeal to allow the freedman the vote. From 1881 to 1884, he edited the Nashville American. He also wrote the Life and Times of Andrew Jackson. He died in Nashville December 13, 1907.

from Biographical Dictionary of the Confederacy by Jon L. Wakelyn, Westport, CT 1977
He moved with parents to Franklin County, c.1828; after leaving father?s farm

From the Procedings of the Bar Association of Tennessee.

REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON OBITUARIES AND MEMORIALS,?
Hon. Foster V. Brown, President: The Special Committee appointed to draft memorials of the members who have died since the former meet.ing, to be inserted in the published proceedings of the Tennessee Bar Association, beg leave to submit the following :
ARTHUR ST, CLAIR COLYAR.
Col. Arthur St. Clair Colyar was born in a dwelling situated on the banks of the historic Nolachucky River, in Washington County, seven miles west of Jonesboro, June 23, 1815, and died at Nashville, December 13, 1907. His long life, therefore, extended over a period of more than 89 years. During this lapse of time, beginning almost with the infancy of the country, what a kaleidescope of change passed before his discerning eyes !
When he was about nine years old his father, Alexander
Colyar, ?removed to Hillsboro in what is now Franklin County, -and,
as the father was a farmer, Arthur began industrial life
as a plow boy, and received onlysuch education as could be
had in a pioneer country. -At the age of ?22 he entered the office
of Col. Micah Taul, of Winchester, as a law student. In 1846
he obtained his license and formed a partnership with W. P.
Hickerson, at Winchester. Here he soon made a reputation
which encouraged him to venture into wider fields ; he removed
in a few years to Winchester, and formed a partnership with
his kinsman, A. S. Marks, who was afterwards Governor, and
with John Frizzell, who afterward became a prominent man.
Col. Colyar?s public spirit led -him into active politics, State
and National. He was a member of the? national convention
in 1860, which nominated Bell and Everett for President and
Vice-President respectively, on ?the Whig ticket, and made an
active canvass in favor of the ticket in the hope of saving the
Union. He opposed secession, but at the parting of the ways .

he cast his destiny with the South. He was elected to the Confederate Congress, in which he served with ?the same zealand energy that always characterized the man. After the Civil \Var he settled at Nashville and practiced law, at one time in partnership with Henry S. Foote, and at other times
alone, or in association with various other attorneys. *
A fen- years after the close of the war he came connected
as stockholder, director and president, of the Tennessee Coal
and Railroad Railroad Company.
afterward the Tennessee Coal, Iron &
Railroad Company. He was not especially gifted as a
business man, but by his efforts he saved the company from wreck, and so inspired the financial world with his confidence
in the industry that it was placed on .he way to a success that has finally brought it to a very high place among the industries of the country. About this time he was very aggressive
in his fight against a ring rule in the city of Nashville, which
resulted in the city being placed in the hands of a receiver and
in its complete relief from its distressing condition.

In 1881 he took charge-of the American, a leading paper throughdut the State.
His last important work was of a historic and ?literary
character, and in this, as a fitting climax to his laborious and
zealous life, he left behind him the fruit of years of painstaking labor.
Nothing that he ever did was perhaps more pleasing and gratifying to him than his authorship of the "Life and Times of Andrew Jackson", which is truly a monument to his industry in his old age.

Col. Colyar was always prominent as a lawyer especially
as an advocate, being eloquent, strong in debate, and forceful
in pursuit of what was right. He was a participant in many of
the most important suits in both State and Federal Courts.
Among other important cases, he represented the State in the
United States Supreme Court in the boundary line case between
Virginia and Tennessee, which he won in 1893.

One of Col. Colyar?s most pronounced characteristics was his strong
and enthusiastic interest in everything pertaining
to public well-being and moral welfare. He was in deep sympathy with everything tending to the material prosperity of the country, and the intellectual, moral and religions culture
of society, and was found among the active promoters of schools, colleges and churches, and was an ardent advocate of the establishment and construction of railroads,manufactories, mines and commercial and financial enterprises. He was an uncompromising? friend of law and order, sobriety and
purity -in individuals and government. He was a total abstainer
and was the author of the Four Mile Law, one of the:
most unique and successful bits of legislation that the country
has known. His courage was almost unlimited. Like all posi-tive
characters he occasionally fell into mistakes of judgment,
and was sometimes criticised even when he was in the right.
As might be expected of such an one, he sacrificed himself, so
far as public office was concerned, and died a poor man, being
in active practice almost to the end of his days. The objects
and purposes of the Bar Association fell naturally in line with
Col. - Colyar?s instincts and principles, for whatever organization
tended or purposed to cultivate right dealing, right thinking
and professional ethics could not fail to meet with his
warm and enthusiastic sympathy and support To the end of
his life these things were his guilding stars.
[Colyer.FTW]

Subject moved with parents to Franklin County, c.1828; after leaving father?s farm

Mr. A.S Colyar book entitled "Life and Times of Andrew Jackson" on page 27, Vol I, says that he was the great-grandson of Samuel Sherill. 
Arthur St. Clair Colyar
 
140 This husband and wife are cousins, Marcus Lashbrook’s mother was Ursula Colyar sister to Alexander Colyar. Charity Colyar
 
141
21 S.W. 659


COLYAR et al.
v.
SAX et al.
DUNCAN et al.
v.
SAME.


Supreme Court of Tennessee.


February 7, 1893.

Appeal from chancery court, Grundy county; McConnell, Chancellor.

Bill in equity by E. F. Colyar and others against Max Sax, trustee, and others, and a bill by W. M. Duncan and others against the same defendants. The two causes were consolidated, and heard on pleadings and proofs. From the decree entered all parties appeal. Reversed.

J. H. Holman, for E. F. Colyar and others. Vertrees & Vertrees, for Duncan and others. Brown & Spears, for Spears. N. Cohn, for Sax and others. Steger, Washington & Jackson, for W. D. Spears. John A. Pitts and W. C. Shelton, for A. S. Colyar. J. B. Fergusson, guardian ad litem. J. C. Bradford, for Fall and others.

WILKES, J.

The first-named bill was filed to cancel certain deeds made by E. F. Colyar to Max Sax, trustee, and to set up a resulting trust in the lands conveyed in E. F. Colyar. The second bill was filed to sell the same lands for partition, to fix the rights of parties therein, and divide the proceeds. The chancellor, Hon. T. M. McConnell, fixed the rights of the parties, by decree, and ordered a sale of the lands. There was no dissatisfaction with, or appeal from, the decree for sale, but none of the several parties interested were satisfied with the decree fixing their rights inter sese, and all have appealed and assigned errors, which raise simply the question as to the proper distribution of the proceeds of the lands, when they shall be sold. The facts, so far as necessary to be stated, are found to be as follows: About 1882, E. F. Colyar, who resided at Tracy City, Grundy county, conceived the idea of buying up a large number of tracts of mineral lands, with a view of consolidating them into one body, and enlisting capitalists in their development. Soon after he began operations, he associated with him E. O. Nathurst and W. D. and

Page 660

N. B. Spears; the first named being very familiar with the mineral wealth of the region, and the two latter being attorneys familiar with the titles of the lands in that section. A. S. Colyar soon became interested, and furnished some money to be used in the purchase of the lands, $1,500 of which he obtained from Richardson, Fall, and Longhmiller, upon an agreement with said A. S. Colyar that, to the extent of the money furnished, they were to have an interest in the lands. Still the parties could not command the necessary funds to carry out their designs, and on 21st day of June, 1884, Benton and John McMillan accepted a written proposal from E. F. Colyar and E. O. Nathurst to go into the enterprise upon terms that they were to furnish not exceeding $20,000 to pay for the...
 
Elbert Franklin Sevier Colyar
 
142 [Colyer.FTW]

[Collierj.ftw]

Wrote A Boy's Opinion of General Lee.
[ColyerV2.FTW]

[Collierj.ftw]

Wrote A Boy's Opinion of General Lee.

How the president of Washington College appeared to a shy young freshman from
Tennessee is told by John B. Colyar.
Appears on page 477 of The Robert E. Lee Reader by Stanley F. Horn
Impressions as a student at Washington College Lexington
" The morning after we reached Lexington we repaired to the office of General Lee for the purpose of matriculation and receiving instructions as to the duties devolving upon us as students. I entered the office with reerential awe, expecting to see the great warrior whose fame then encircled the civilized globe as I had pictured him in my own imagination. General Lee was alone, looking over a paper. He arose when we entered and received with a quiet, gentlemenly dignity that was so natural and easy and kind that the feeling of awe left me at the threshold of his door. General Lee had but one manner in his intercourse with men. It was the same as to the peasant as to the prince, and the student was received with the easy courtliness that would have bestowed on the greatest imperial dignitary of Europe.

When we had registered, my brother asked the General for a copy of his rules. General Lee said, "young gentleman, we have no printed rules. We have but one rule here and it is that every student must be a gentleman." I did not until after years fully realize the comprehensiveness of his remark and how completely it covered every essential rule that should govern the conduct and intercourse of men." ........... 
John B. Colyar
 
143 http://www2.volstate.edu/cbucy/History%202030/suffrage.htm
Lulu Colyar Reese, Memphis (1860-19 )

Lulu Colyar Reese had her first introduction into the political world at the age of seventeen, when she joined other Nashville women in an appearance before the Tennessee General Assembly to secure the property of Andrew Jackson, the Hermitage, for the state. The effort was successful and the Ladies Hermitage Association was founded.

After her marriage to Isaac B. Reese, she had regular meetings and gatherings in their home to bring together society leaders, Vanderbilt professors, and other thinkers of the city for conversation and interaction. As many as 300 persons attended these gatherings which were described as a “Parisian salon.” When the Reese family moved to Paducah, Kentucky, she founded a similar group there.

In 1900, the Reese family moved to Memphis where she became active in the Federation of Women’s Clubs as president of the Nineteenth Century Club. She used her experience in the women’s clubs of Memphis to become active in the political problems of her day and worked for suffrage. She led the fight for women on the Memphis City Board of Education and was one of the first two women elected to the Board, running for the office on the Non-Partisan ticket. While on the school board, she fought for free textbooks and anti-child labor laws.

Lulu Reese was in Nashville at the Hermitage Hotel in August, 1920 when the 19th amendment was passed. She was active in the National American Woman Suffrage Association as well as the National Women’s Party.
 
Lula Colyar
 
144 [Colyer.FTW]

Two Daughters of
Tennessee
By GILBERT R. ADKINS

Franklin County Historical

MARTHA COLYAR: MRS. ROSEBORO'

It was natural that Martha Clarissa Colyar should regard Franklin County - a refuge in time of trouble. She was born here. the twelfth of thirteen children. on April 20.1834, while her parents were temporarily living in a portion of Franklin County that is now in Coffee County. Because she thought herself so excellently educated she maintained that instruction in Tennessee was the beat in the country, and she was intensely fond of Winchester and its schools all her life. Her undated diploma from the Winchester Female Academy1 signed by Jno. G. Biddle. J.W. Tyler. P.S. Decherd. and F.A. Foughmiller. was a treasured keepsake.(2)
Samuel Reed Roseboro, who prepared for the ministry at college in Lebanon. was born in Lincoln County. son of John Alexander Roseboro (3) The family was one of obvious substance, generosity, and culture It was in Winchester that Samuel saw Martha Colyar for the first time. when they passed on a sidewalk. True to his Presbyterian background. Samuel claimed he was not swayed by Martha's attractively fussy clothes, sapphire blue eyes. or faint violet perfume: it was the look on her face, "as if she had just left off prayer." Later, when they became well acquainted, he asked her to share his manse In Selma, Alabama Martha objected on the ground that a devout Method let with an appetite for the fiction of Sir Welter Scott should not be the wife of a Presbyterian minister who drew the line at poetry of Pope and Shelley. The courtship nevertheless progressed toward wedding plans after settlement of a difference of opinion about the officiating clergy-

_ 32


man's denomination.

Miss Martha (Mattie) Colyar1 whose parents were dead, married Reed Roseboro' on January 8, 1857, near Winchester, In the humble surroundings of an unpainted country home on the aide of a hill. Martha was clutching a Scott novel as the couple left for a short journey down the Mississippi River. Reed and Mattie returned to live in Pulaski, Tennesee. Dr. Houston by request had omitted the word "obey" from their marriage ceremony,(4) and It was whispered among the women that Martha, "with that Colyar 1ook111 told her beat Winchester friend, Lou Murrell, that she would never accept a letter addressed to Mm. S.
R. Roseboro'. She Insisted on her Identity as Mrs. Martha Colyar Roseboro', a radical position at the time.(5) Her husband signaled capitulation by buying his wife a eat of the Waverley novels.

In those prewar years, Martha, an emancipationist, goaded her husband on what to say in his slavery sermons. He occasionally took a walk In order to get away from the barrage only to return four hours later and have Martha pick up at her monologue's breaking-off point. Reed and the Pulaski neighbors listened while Mat talked. She actually kept a blue notebook in which she recorded what he said he thought he had said on slavery from the pulpit. Martha Was successful In radicalizing her husband on the Issue, although he had presumably heard silmilar arguments from his seminary professor. Because of Martha's suasion, her husband consented to move to Missouri, and when war came, Martha refuged to Mattoon, Illinois, while the minister enlisted
as chaplain on the Union side The Yankee enlistment resulted In his parents disowning him.(6)

POSTWAR RNANCIAL STRAITS

When the war w- over, Martha Colyar Roseboro fled a cramped Illinois hotel room and returned to family and friends in Tennessee. Her chaplain-husband was discharged from the United States Army on July
33

_ 34
12, 1865, and joined his wife in 8 round of visits to relatives The trip had to be brief because Mr. Roseboro had already been appointed pastor of a Congregational church in Macon, Missouri. Mrs. Roseboro, that fail, put down roots by purchasing a small Missouri farm with money earned during the war from teaching school, sewing, and working in a hotel at Mattoon, Illinois in part because of this investment, by the spring of 1868 the young family was financially distressed. and Martha made plans to return to Tennessee to consult her brother, for If he could not help personally he would at least advise her. "Arthur", she said, "has a genius about money." Foremost in Martha's mind was the hope that Arthur would help with her daughter's education.
Martha had not received a letter from Arthur Colyar since her last visit, nor had she heard from her friends in Winchester. Whether in communication or not1 relatives have a way of sensing inopportune times for visits. Colonel Colyar was attempting to effect governmental reform in Nashville by openly striking the Alden ring1(7) and he well knew that public reaction to his entertaining a sister with abolitionist sympathies could be damaging. To get Martha out of Nashville he planned a sightseeing trip to his Sewanee Mine. From them he would urge that she visit relatives in Coffee County while he returned to Nashville
In later life Martha's daughter, Viola1 described Tennessee as it appeared that day she and five relatives rode a train toward Cowan.

Our part of Tennessee had escaped the worst of war's ravages All over the wide south the fallen walls of houses heaped around gaunt. Smokeless chimneys standing straight in desolate dignity made the land strange to the eyes. Strange one would think, to the very birds who were flying so busily in the sky: but here in middle Tennessee, many a man came back to a home little altered: the old roof still stood, and still sheltered his own people; his own fields lay about him, and it was a striking evidence of the metaphysical character of life that these accustomed and solid realities often but sharpened in men's souls the sense of ruinous revolution , and made the glowing sunlight glare the stranger in their eyes.

By contrast, the same trip between Nashville and Cowan had Impressed Martha Roseboro as leading through an exhausted and poverty-stricken part of Tennessee; as she recalled it, innumerable signs of military conflict scarred the earth.
In addition to observing the countryside, there was ample opportunity during the ride for Martha to register objection to her brothers hiring



_ 35

convict labor in the Sewanee Mines. Arthur Colyar reacted with assumed cheer, pointed out that he had started operations at Moffat, Tracy City, and beyond1 in order to help the state, and that the business would soon be on a firmer basis. Recovery was underway from the twin setbacks of war and the outlay of almost two million dollars over a six-year period for railroad construction up Sewanee Mountain to Tracy, during which the company received no monetary return whatsoever. Colyar referred to his company railroad from Cowan as "that darling line of track," and remarked that "already them are summer boarders living up on that high perch of ours."
At Cowan there was a primitive ticket office. Colyar led his party peg it with a wave to his employee, the structure's lone occupant, and followed a sooty trainman down the tracks, the rest of the party walking with difficulty over the rough. At last they entered a queer little car that nevertheless had cushioned mats. There was a tin cooler marked "liquid ice water" and a chained, nickel-plated cup "all in grimy completeness." A mountaineer in blue homespun and strew hat who had been down into the valley was mated next to an old woman in a bonnet. In whispers Colonel Colyar told his niece a story about another old mountaineer who thought them was a devil inside the company's train engine, and it was the devil that made the train climb.

Almost immediately we found ourselves ascending the mountain --our little car clinging to a long empty coal train that. in its turn. fast to the puffing. straining locomotive as far before and above us. it climbed a zigzag track up '. mountainside. The sight was a novel one and to those Of our number who repeatedly had crossed me Sierra Nevada and the Rocky Mountains. giving, as if felt a startlingly distinct Impression of climbing.

The trip into the mines never took place. Tracy City had received a telegraphic message that Colonel Colyar was needed in Nashville. He departed while his wife, Agnes,(1O) and relatives scattered to Coffee County. Martha returned to penury in Missouri. A second daughter born to her did not survive infancy. 
Martha Clarissa Colyar
 
145 This husband and wife are cousins. James Lashbrook’s mother was Ursula Colyar sister to Alexander Colyar Susan Colyar
 
146

The Newrivernotes.com shows an extract of the 1782 personal property tax records for Washington County in Col. Arthur Campbell's precinct and shows a William 'Coller' (which I suspect is really Collier) with 1 tithe and 5 horses  
William Colyar
 
147
Presumed older brother to William = Captain Thomas Collier who signed oath of allegience in 1777 in Henry County VA:
A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS, BY E. POLK JOHNSON, LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY VOL. III, PAGE 1621 PUBLISHED 1912 FOUND IN HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY:

"Captain Thomas Collier was a son of John Collier, )r., and Sarah Collier, his cousin and wife. John,Jr..was the son of John Collier, Sr., and a Miss Gaines, his second wife. John Collier, Sr., was the son of Charles and Mary Collier, and Charles Collier was born in Eng land about 1660. and resided in King and Queen county, Virginia." 
William Colyar
 
148
Washington cty TN deeds book 18 PG 10 (per notes of Plano Tx researcher given to Janis Ragar) shows transfer by William Colyar jr 1/12/1826 of Negro boy named Issac about 11-12 years old to Joseph Hunter.

Same source refers to Deed BK 18 page 303 wherein William Colyer sells a negro girl about 12 years old named Hannah to Thomas j. Brown.
 
William Colyar
 
149 Greene County, TN Deed book 2 page 172-173. 20 May 1792 William Colyar and Ann his wife sold to William Scruggs 130 acres of land lying below Andrew Leepers on the north side of Nolichuckey River.  William Colyar
 
150 Some researchers have expounded on this William Colyar's full name as "William J.P. Colyar" . This researcher suspects this is misguided having been pulled from references in certain court documents in Washington County TN referring to William Colyar of 1754's son, William Colyar. William Colyar Jr. , who lived in Washington County TN was a justice of the peace there. Some documents refer to him as William Colyar JP.......I think referring to his office and this may have been misinterpreted and attributed to his father as his name.

THE A.E. HART BOOK THE "RICHARD CALLOWAY FAMILY" IN SPEAKING OF JOHN COLLIER OF 1742 WHO WAS MARRIED TO GRIZZELDA TAYLOR, SAID THAT JOHN OF 1742'S FATHER WAS A JOHN COLLIER A PROSPEROUS PLANTER. THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN JOHN COLLIER OF 1707. IT SAYS THAT JOHN OF 1707 HAD MANY SONS AND DAUGHTERS, ONE OF WHICH WAS A WILLIAM (THIS WOULD BE WILLIAM OF 1754) MOVED TO TENNESSEE AND WAS LOST TO ALL KNOWLEDGE OF THE KINDRED. THIS IS THE ONLY INDICATION OF WHO WAS WILLIAM OF 1754'S FATHER I HAVE FOUND. HOWEVER IT IS BORN OUT BY THE SEVERAL INDICATORS. FIRST THE QUESTION OF WHY WOULD JOHN OF 1707'S WILL NOT INCLUDE THIS CHILD WILLIAM IF HE WAS IN FACT A CHILD. THE REASON WAS THAT JOHN OF 1707'S WILL WAS DRAWN IN 1746 BEFORE WILLIAM OF 1754 WAS BORN, AS WAS THE CASE OF ANOTHER DOCUMENTED CHILD OF JOHN OF 1707---MARY....WHO THE VIRGINIA COUSINS BOOK SAYS WAS BORN IN 1756. NOTE THAT THIS JOHN OF 1707 DIED IN 1759. IF IN FACT WILLIAM COLYAR'S FATHER WAS JOHN COLLIER OF 1707, IT MAKES SINCE THAT WILLIAM MAY HAVE LEFT AND GONE TO TENNESSEE LOSING ALL CONTACT WITH HIS VIRGINIA COLLIER RELATIVES, FOR HE WOULD HAVE BEEN BUT 5 YEARS OLD WHEN HIS FATHER DIED AND BUT 10 WHEN HIS MOTHER DIED.

WILLIAM COLYER from Dean Hunter Lexington Ky gedcom:

WILLIAM COLYER of Greenbriar County, Virginia was living
in Montgomery County, Virginia in the neighborhood of Roanoke,
married a woman named St.Clair and had several sons, among
them JOHN COLYER. Some of these sons of William Colyer were
killed by Indians on the frontier of Virginia and in Kentucky. From a letter from Dr. Welby Colyer (a son of St.Clair Colyer) of Garrett, Ill., 1937, who died in 1940; Delia Colyer Powers, his sister, said that Dr. Welby Colyer had two daughters. A letter from Dr. Dr. Welby Colyer was found in a library in Salisbury, N. C. said that a Mrs. Bales in Pennington Gap, Virginia, said that William Colyer married a St.Clair woman and said that it was on file in Abbington. . . Stella Colyer said that she checked and was told that the records don't go back that far. Mrs. Bales said that when CHARLES COLYER died, that a Mrs. William Colyer was one heir. She also said that St. Clair lived in St.Clair's Bottoms, near Powell Valley, Virginia. WILLIAM COLYER owned land in Washington County, Tennessee. (Washington County, Tenn., Deeds, Vol. 17, pg. 210, Oct. 18, 1821) JOHN COLYER of Pulaski County, Kentucky to Alexander Colyer of Washington County, Tenn., . ..a11 of my share in the estate of WILLIAM COLYER, deed., my father, to the three tracts of land in Washington County, Tennessee,on the south side of the Nolachucky River. -- This must have been JOHN'S brother, who stayed in Tennessee. Vol. 19, pg. 38, Washington Co., Deeds, April 9, 1827, . ..John Calvert and his wife Dorcas, (formerly Dorcas Colyer of Copper County, Missouri, convey land from the estate of her father WILLIAM COLYER, Sr. . I late of Washington
County, Tenn. JOHN, Alexander, William and Dorcas are children of William Colyer. Stella Colyer

Early tax records show a WILLIAM COLYER was living on the
Nolachucky River in 1790, owned land and was paying a pole. so
he was under 50. All free white men at that time between 21
and 50 had to pay a white poll." ____-________---__-__
List of taxables for years 1791, 1792, 1793, 1794, 1797, 1798, 1799, and 1801 list WILLIAM COLYER, on the Nolachucky
River, in Washington County, Tennessee.3 _____-_________-____--
WILLIAM COLYER was a Justice of the Peace in Washington
County, Tenn. in 1821.
1
. Letter from Stella Colyer to Gail Myers, April 23, 1973.
2
From Mrs. Wallace Tilden, Johnson City, Tenn. 3 . Mary H. McCowen, WASHINGTON CO. TENN. RECORDS, vol. 1, 1964


ABOVE INFO FROM GEDCOM OF CREATED BY DEAN HUNTER OF LEXINGTON KY.
__________________________________________________________________________________

email from Clark Sinclair at University of Texas at Austin sinclair@tenet.edu dated 7/22/1998 refers to a deed book 2 page 506 entry wherein Agnes St. Clair sells her inherited share of St. Clair Bottom. This may be Washington Co. TN or Augusta Co. VA deed book
__________________________________________________________________________________
Washington County Historical Association
http://www.uriel.com/history/ironwork.htm
Embreeville Ironworks

In July 1820?a few months before Elihu's death?the Embree brothers bought a mine, forge, and 260 acres of land on the Nolichucky River in Washington County, near the mouth of Bumpass Cove. Bumpass Cove, which is about 10 miles from Greasy Cove, seems to have been named after one Isaac Bumpass who lived in Washington County before 1770. However, he does not seem actually to have owned the land. The name is sometimes spelled Bumpres, Bumphers, and Bumbers [23].

Mining in Bumpass Cove started in the 1770s in a mine owned by William Colyer. Lead from the mines is reported to have been used to make bullets for the Battle of Kings Mountain in 1780. The ore was said to be so rich that it could be smelted over an open wood fire and molded into bullets [24]. In 1791 Colyer sold the property, which then consisted of 550 acres of land, to Louis Newhouse and Andrew Leuthold for £400. This and adjacent land, totaling 3,100 acres was sold in 1800 to John Sevier, Jr.?the son of General John Sevier?for $3,000. In 1812 they sold it to William P. Chester who, in turn, sold it to the Embrees in 1820 for $4,500 [25]. However, Chester excluded from this sale 200 acres, which apparently included a lead, mine.
______________________________________________________________________

Re: Military record: Ms. Janis Ragar indicated that she had info that William was a private in the 6th Virginia Regiment under Capt. Samuel Hopkins. Per Richard Curtis search of 6th Virginia Regiment microfilm service records from National Archives copy in TN state library and archives, no William Collier/Colyer/Colyar appears 8/15/98.

In Revolutionary War Records of Mecklenburg County Virginia by Katherine B. Elliott published by Southern Historical Press, Inc., page 43 refers to a William Collier b 1753 Enlisted in Meck. Co. for 2 years under Capt. Samuel Hopkins. Re-inlisted for three years in Company of Horse under Col. Thomas Bland. Pen. S-39334.
White's Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files Vol I page 713 shows a William Collier, S39334, VA Line, appl 20 Jul 1818 Mecklenburg Cty VA aged 58 & had lived there at enl.
I looked at copy of this pension extract in TN state library and archives 8/15/98 and noted that his man was crippled from war and had no family. Says he testified he was 61 6/19/1820 and after serving with Hopkins re-enlisted with company of horse in regiment of Col. Thomas Bland for 3 years. Says he is rough carpenter, without family and incapable of supporting himself from age and effects of wound received through his knee during war. Was placed on pension roll 7/20/1818 Cert # 12731 was issued 7/22/1819. There for these records do not show direct war service of William Colyar of Washington County TN


Property: Per Dessie Simmons Johnson city TN from book North Carolina land grants in TN 1778-1791 by Goldien Burgner pub. Southern Historical:
page 78 : 1788 grant of 130 acres North side of Nolichucky River Washington co. TN

page 33 grant # 882: 1789 200 acres on Bumpus creek on southside of Nolichucky. 200 acres both sides of Nolichucky river

page 34: 1790 150 acres in Bumpus cove/creek.

page 137 grant 462 to a William Collier in 1782 640 acres on south side of Red River in what is now Davidson County TN?? this one not verified as connected to William Colyer of Washington Co. TN

Per Dessie Simmons 8/8/98; many people who got these grants served in the Revolution but none of the North Carolina grants were for war service as in other states. She said that North Carolina grants were all paid for at the rate of about 50 schillinngs per 100 acres. She said that even John Sevier had to pay for his land. This is confirmed by deeds I have copies of supporting the land grants above that show that William Colyar paid for the land in these grants.

See imaged article on Arthur St. Clair Colyar of article in Tennessean newspaper in 1907, stating that his grandfather (William) fought in the battle of King's mountain. I have not found William in any of the official lisings of soldiers at that battle, however following info from the National Park Service website for OverMountain Victory National Historic Trails at http://www.nps.gov/ovvi/troops.htm states that "The Patriot commanders did not keep or report official rosters of their men engaged against Ferguson at Kings Mountain. Dr. Lyman Draper's King's Mountain and its Heroes, combined with pension applications filed by veterans and theri survivors well after the battle, are the main sources of information about the army.

Per email from Pat Ross who works for the Bassett Virginia Historical library in Henry County VA, she stated per review of records there these folks are recorded as having take the Oath of Allegiance in Henry County VA:

"Thomas Collier, William Collier, Charles Collier, Jesse Collier...no other
spellings were listed. No date was given.

The heading was "Citizens of Henry County who took the Oath of Allegiance"
and it stated "The General Assembly of Virginia, when The United States was
in its infancy, passed an Act to oblige all free male inhabitants of the
State above sixteen years of age to give assurance of allegiance to the
same. The following is a list of those who took the oath from the original
record among the files in the Clerk's Office. At the time some were away
fighting Indians, others hunting, and there were a few who refused to take
the oath." "


See the PDF documents section of this site referenced off the home page that says this Charles Colyer is of same family as A.S. Colyar descended. This is stated in Andrew Michaux?s Travels in the Tennessee Country contain reference to him in March 1796 arriving at Charles Collier?s 10 miles from Jonesborough. A footnote to this comment states that this Charles Collier was of the family from which descended Col. Arthur St. Clair Colyar. You can see the Michaux's book in PDF section.

This connects this Charles Colyer/Colyar to William Colyar of Washington Cty TN. Therefore, since Charles' pension file shows he was from Henry County VA, (see PDF section of site) it follows that the William Colyar showing up in Henry County VA signing an oath of allegience there with Charles in 1777 (see PDF section fo site) is brother to Charles. Thus it seems that the Colyer/Colyar/Coliar of Henry County VA is in fact the family of William Colyar of Washington County TN.


The only land records I could find in Henry County VA is for a John Colliar on Leatherwood Creek off Smith River in Henry county VA. I believe this to be either brother or Father to William Colyar.

http://www.roanetn.com/Holland_early.htm
A List of the Company of Militia Under the Command of Capt. Joseph Martin in PITTSYLVANIA CO.VA 1774

Joseph Martin, Captain; John Cunningham, Lieutenant, David Chadwell, Ensign, William Cox and John Turner, Sergeants, Robert Perryman, Clerk

Benja Dillion, Carter Dillion, Henry Dillion, Edmd Lyne, Michael Barker, John Barker, Mordicai Hoard, Henry Bradbury, Robert Searcy, John Witt(en)?, John Stamps, WILLIAM HOLLAND, THOS HOLLAND, James Short, James Spencer, John Walker, Henry Tate, Nathl Tate, Edmond Graves, Joseph Baker, John Palphrey, Humphry Posey, John Noe Senr, John Barker, Joel Barker, Chars Barker, Josiah Cox, Prier Noe, James Godard, William Dotson, Alex Jarves, Wm. Collyer, Jos Laurence, Chas Foster, John Turner Geo Reaves, Daniel Smith, Josiah Turner, Wm Turner, Josh Byrd, Richd Baker, Wm Mullins Senr, William Mullins Junr, John Mullins, Ambrose Mullis, Wm Standly Sr, Wm Standly Jur, Richd Standly, John Standly, Saml Packwood, Baine Carter, Pleasant Duke, Charles Dunkan, Wm Reed, John Goin, Richd Colliar, William Bays

The majority of information shown on these pages (other than individual contributors as noted), comes from the writings of Snyder E. Roberts, and his wife, Pauline Halburnt Roberts. The most frequently-quoted book is his Roots of Roane County, TN - 1792- , published in 1981. Also his first book, Roberts Families of Roane County, TN, published in 1969-now out of print. (Reprints of Roots available from Oliver Springs Historical Society)

http://www.victorianvilla.com/sims-mitchell/local/clement/mc/abb/06.htm


Note above that William Collyer in Joseph Martin Militia Company Pittsylvania County VA 1774. Henry county was formed out of Pittsylvania County VA in 1775-1776. In "General Joseph Martin, of Virginia, An Unsung Hero of the Virginia Frontier" found in The Filson Club History Quarterly Vol 10 Louisville KY April 1936 No. 2 ; it says that Joseph Martin retired to his property on Leatherwood Creek ( SAME AS JOHN COLLIAR ABOVE).

Volume II of Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlment in Virginia--Augusta County Original Court Records 1745-1800 by Lyman CHalkley. Pub. by Mary S. Lockwood, 1912......states
in VOl II page 76 Judgements. Simon Eli vs. Robert and William Davis and Alexr. Wiley--O.S. 36; N.S. 12-- Bill 27th Oct 1800. In 1771 William McGhee (McGaughey) made a settlment in the Turkey Cove in Powell's Valley in the present Lee County, and obtained a certificate from the Commissioners in 1779, etc. William Collier deposes that in the winter and spring preceding Christian's campaign he remained at the campt of Thomas Lovelady. William was a hunter and trapper. the Indians became troublesome and the people had to leave.



From website of Jean Colyer Grumbling: this Power of Attorney of son Alexander Colyar (son of William) which states that William Colyar and wife Nancy may have been living in Pulaski County Kentucky at the date of their death :

Power of Attorney dated February 26, 1839 reads as follows:

Know all men by thesse present that I, alexander Colyear of the County of Franklin and State of Tennessee hereby nominate, constitue and appoint my son, George T. Colyer of said county and state, my true and lawfull Attorney in fact for me and in my name to do and attend to all business I have any interest in in the state of Kentucky and more particularly to ask for, receive from and receipt for all money coming to me from the estate of my deceased Father, William Colyear late of the County of Pulaski and state of Kentucky or from the estate of my deceased mother, Nancy Colyear of said county and state and my said Attorney is also hereby authorized to bring suit or suits as he may think proper for the recovery of the same or to compromise the same in such way as he may think best and to give such receipts in my name as may be necessary hereby satisfying and confirming all the acts of my said Attorney may do in pursuance of this poser the same as if I was present and done the same myself. Given under my hand and seal this 26th day of February 1839.
Alexander Colyear (his mark) ?
State of Tennessee
Franklin County
I, John R. Paterick(?)an acting Justice of the Peace in and for the county and state aforsaid hereby certify that Alexander Colyear personally appeared before me this day and acknowledged the within power of Attorney to be his act and deed for the purpose therein expressed.
Given under my hand and seal this 26th day of February, 1839.
John R. Patrick
Justice of the Peace
State of Tennessee
Franklin County
I, William W. Brazelton, clerk of the County Court of said County certify that John R. Patrick is and was at the time of making the above (unreadable) an acting Justice of the Peace in and for said County duly commissioned, legally qualified as such and entitled to (unreadable) and credit in all of his official acts.
In Witness whereof I have here unto set my hand and affixed my seal of office at office, the 26th day of February, A.D.1839
William W. Brazelton, Clerk
State of Tennessee
Franklin County
I, Wallis Estill (?) Jr., chariman and presiding magistrate of the county court of said county certify that William W. Brazelton whose name is signed to the foregoing certificate is and was Clerk of said county of the time of signing the same and that his attestation is in due form of Law and sealed with the county seal. Given under my hand and seal this 26th day of February A.D. 1839.
W. Estill Jr. Chairman of Franklin County Court
(followed by another certification by Will Fawcett!


Copy of Power of Attorney, now on file with Jean Colyer Grumbling.POA located in Book 10, Page 147.
"Tennessee" by Moore, pg. 102

Richard Curtis note: based on info in this power of attorney, it appears that William Colyar and his wife Nancy had gone to live with their son John Colyer living in Pulaski County in the region of Buck Creek and Cumberland River in Jugornot Hollow. It appears that William died and Nancy died there. John had deeds to about 150 acres at least in that area. He sold it to his first born son, Bluford Colyer in 1842 after having moved up Pittman creek to Ruth. My guess is that I suspect that this power of attorney that Alexander, John's brother, filed in 1839 coincided with the death of his mother Nancy Ann St. Claire Colyar. William is reported to have died 20 years earlier in 1819. Ancestry.com reports in the Tennessee Census of 1810's that in 1814, Wm Colyar Sr. and Wm Colyar Jr. and Alexander Colyer are still living in Washington County TN. It must be some time after this and before 1819 William Colyar Sr. moves to Kentucky with son John in Pulaski County. They had likely gone to live with their most financially secure son, John....who like his father William had amassed land along a river likely in search of mineral rights. Not finding much, John was farming instead in this very mountainous region. The only flat tillable land in the area was the jugornot Hollow off what is now highway 769 leading to Buck Creek boat dock. John's other brother Alexander had migrated from East TN to Franklin County TN (winchester) and was farming on leased land. His house had burned down on the Nolichucky river in Jonesboro TN area so migrated to Winchester TN. Since he had no deeded land in area....it appears he was not financially successful. The other son of William ( William Jr.) had become a justice of the peace in Jonesboro and was not a large land owner. So it appears John was the largest land owner by pioneering property and obtaining first deeds along the cumberland river in Pulaski county KY. 
William Colyar
 

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