From Russell Dyche's "Laurel County Kentucky." 


""The Kentucky Mountains", a Filson Club publication, has been quoted
previously. This portion of our story on The Wilderness Road is based
almost entirely on records related in this most interesting and factual
work by Miss Mary Verhoeff, now First Vice-President of this Club which has
contributed so much to our knowledge of the history of Kentucky. ……


The Sublimity Road
"In an Act of 1858, establishing "the London, Somerset and Waitsborough
(Head of navigation on the Cumberland river--Burnside) Turnpike Road
Company," is this statement: "And as there are funds in the hand of Jarvis
Jackson, of Laurel county, as a Commissioner, directed by act of General
Assembly to be applied to the opening of a road from London, in Laurel
county, to the Cumberland river; and as the route contemplated...is the
same....a considerable portion of distance toward Cumberland river...the
County Court of Laurel county shall have power, if it so desires, to order
an appropriation of such portion of said fund" prorata to this new venture.
This possibly was the same "good" road, from London and Somerset, that Dr.
Christopher C. Graham has been credited with building to Sublimity Springs,
which was incorporated as a town, Feb. 12, 1860.
""By the close of the period," said Miss Verhoeff, "there were three main
State roads, from the vicinity of Manchester, intersecting the Wilderness
Road, which had been maintained by tollgates upon them or by tolls
collected on the main road. One led via Burning Springs, Clay county,
crossing the Madison road near (the) Hazel Patch. (Via Mershons Cross Road
and Windingblade road to north of new Hazelpatch on the Wilderness Road.)
Another passed up Otter creek of Goose creek and down Stinking creek to
Cumberland river. The third led to Somerset via London, with a branch
passing through Raccoon Springs on (waters of Robinson creek, a tributary
to) Laurel river.

Road To Mouth Of Laurel
""Besides roads leading to the salt works there were a number of other
tributaries, local routes, which were given occasional aid. The most
important of these extended to coal mines near the mouth of Laurel river,
the head of descending navigation for coal barges on the Cumberland. (Coal
barges were loaded up Rockcastle river to Sublimity Springs, just below the
Narrows.) The opening of a road from London in Laurel county to the mouth
of 'Big Laurel River' was ordered by Act of Feb. 2, 1833. By Act of Jan.
30, 1847, the money and land warrants for the road were transferred to the
road via London to Bates' salt furnace...An Act of Feb. 25, 1835,
appropriated ten thousand acres of land to Pulaski county for the opening
of a road from Somerset to 'coal mines on or near Cumberland river'."

Natural As Shipping Depot
"In this connection, Miss Verhoeff quoted from a report by Captain Howard
Stansbury, United States Engineer, in 1834: "The point (mouth of Laurel)...
from the geographical position would naturally become a depot for
shipment...Lying in the direct route from the upper and lower country it
must before long become the point of deposit for all articles of trade that
depend upon the river for their transportation. The country, especially
between this point and Barbourville, is particularly adapted to the
favorable location of roads, being high and dry at a short distance back
from the river, remarkably free from anything that would render their
construction expensive. I was informed by many of the inhabitants that
could a certain navigation be secured to this point on the river they would
be willing and glad to construct the necessary roads for the transportation
of their produce at their own expense.""



From Russell Dyche's "Laurel County Kentucky."


""The Kentucky Mountains", a Filson Club publication, has been quoted

previously. This portion of our story on The Wilderness Road is based

almost entirely on records related in this most interesting and factual

work by Miss Mary Verhoeff, now First Vice-President of this Club which has

contributed so much to our knowledge of the history of Kentucky.

"Salt was an essential commodity that was not too plentiful in Kentucky at

the time, and a most promising source of salt was on the waters of Goose

Creek in what is now Clay county. So an Act of Dec. 21, 1802, Miss Verhoeff

tells us, established a road from Richmond in Madison county to the salt

works on Goose creek owned by John Patrick and others and known as

Langford's Lick. This was to the vicinity of present Manchester, turning

off from the main Richmond road near (south of) the Rockcastle river. The

Act also provided for a Salt Road from Pulaski Court House to the same

saltworks and also to Outlaw's salt works on Collins Fork, a few miles

northeast of the present day corner of Clay, Knox and Laurel county; which,

of course, would cross Laurel county.